Ed Hartman Music

News

Adventures in Music Licensing September 2018 Vol. 6, No. 8

 

Ed Hartman's 

Adventures in Music Licensing 

September 2018 Vol. 6, No. 8 

Announcements: 

* It been raining a little, and has cooled off in the Pacific NW! Late summer and fall are very nice here. No smoke! Good luck to folks in the hurricane zones. 

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter) Look deep into this newsletter. There are some real gems of info here. 

* I continue to meet individually with folks that have taken my licensing class, along with newbies. The info is continually changing (as you can tell from this newsletter!) You are welcome to schedule a time to meet. I prefer to meet in Edmonds, in my studio. We can take a listen and analyze at your music for licensing potential. I have time most days, including weekends. Fridays are best. Phone and Skype are available for those people not in the Pacific NW. 

* The next music licensing class is quickly approaching on Oct 20, 2018. Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest. If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road. Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area. I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic! 

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below). 

Recent adventures in licensing: 

* To be honest, I've been creating so much music, it's getting hard to keep track of it! I've been steadily pitching. I can report that at TAXI pitch did result in a library contacting me. The crickets stopped for a moment! I've already submitted a custom request for the Happy Birthday music. 

* I am starting a big scoring project. More info soon! 

* Songtradr - I continue to have a number of tracks shortlisted, and in final selection. (Supervisor is listening). Nothing has been picked, but a number of tracks are still in play. I am pitching some halloween music, and holiday music, as I speak! 

* Canadian webseries! The first of four episodes I scored, recently is now online! This one is in the film-noir style (I recommend watching previous episodes to get
context.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2N2pNU1l0Xg&feature=youtu.be 

* New music/videos 

This video features a very kinetic orchestra piece ("Can't Stop, Gonna Drop"). It was originally done for a Elfman-style pitch on Songtradr (made final). I set it against a classic Buster Keaton action sequence ("College" - he did ALL of his own stunts!) 

https://youtu.be/osBEEpcCVHU 

This video features music from my Songtradr digital release, Moving Images (Spotify, Itunes, etc.). (Tracks from previous pitches!) The film was actually shot on my Android phone (I didn't have my regular camera with). A serendipitous moment occurred at the beach. I added the track after shooting, and it worked pretty well. In fact, a local film festival requested it to be shown in a few weeks! A LOTof serendipity in this project. You never know... 

https://youtu.be/JqScyItgm6o 

Regarding the above release, "Moving Images", I put the word out on the release on social media with the Songtradr link. That Songtradr page has had well over 1000 hits. I continue to get notices daily from Songtradr for each hit on the page. 

Songtradr: https://www.songtradr.com/user/playlist/fcqziwfnfhfgkjkc Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/09TYXAyhqmL9mgCWd12JW4? 

         

si=6_SvsaWPQMehF3KmzjvBNQ 

 

Tales from the Tech-Side: 

* Better strings: Absolutely combine your string sounds! I've been using a combination of EW, Logic (EX24) and Soundfonts. I try to overlay a solo violin on top (very subtle) to add life to the sound. For short sounds, I'm going with a combination of staccato and short. Play around with repeat options on EW Strings! Also, there are a LOT of settings on the player on EW. I went years without looking at them. You can change mic arrangements (try close mics, especially on pianos), open and closed piano top, ambience (reverb) within EW Pianos. Wow, what a difference. I may go back and redo older piano tracks. 

Questions from the Audience: (please email!) 

I was wondering if you might be kind enough to point me in the right direction with Publishing. The pros and cons of going Non-exclusive vs. exclusive with certain songs? MO 

The eternal fight between non and exclusive goes on. The landscape is changing, too. There was a time when exclusives would pay you for the song upfront for the privilege of pitching it, publishing it, releasing it and give you a percentage and royalties on any sales or sync licensing. Keep in mind, an exclusive publisher, is basically like a record deal, and they take your publishing, so you may not be able to do anything with the track or even the song, itself, in the future! They would own the song. 

There are exclusve deals with libraries that only are exclusive for licensing. You can still release the song for sale (whatever that means, anymore!)
Non-exclusive deals are always the safest, because you can do anything you want with the song, and put it as many places as you want. 

Non-exclusive re-title - gets complicated. That's where you might want to take my class or invest in a session with me!
Best advice. Get computer savy. Understand platforms like Songtradr. Learn to research music libraries. There are resources, free and pay (musiclibraryreport.com). Even a google search for the name of the library and "reviews" may have results. 

My music wasn't accepted into a music library. What should I do? Does this mean I am not good for this kind of thing? 

Some libraries have gotten harder to get into. I've uploaded many tracks that may never go anywhere. Lately, I think libraries have gotten overwhelmed with tracks. There are a couple of times, where they've told me the music is fine, but they are prioritizing certain genres (corporate/trailer,
etc.). My tracks are there, but may not be viewable on the site. 

Regarding rejection... 

I've been rejected 100 to 1000x more, than accepted to libraries, music supervisors, publishers, pitching companies, film directors, film producers, bands, musicians, gigs, corporations, auditions, jobs, newspaper reviews, and 100s of opportunities I've had. 

In the film TV world we have a saying. Write Submit Forget Repeat. Those that are successful at this, live by those words. Its not easy, even if your music is perfectly produced and recorded. It simply may not fit with someone else's library, film, T.V. show, etc. Its not the music's fault, necessarily. The film or show is what's important. This is the media business. Music is one small aspect of it. If you are a director, you really don't care about the music, unless it suits you. Same with a library. If they don't have a demand, they won't bother stocking the track. I had the same problem owning a drumshop for 25 yrs. Supply and demand. I had great stuff but some simple didn't sell. 

You can create always create more. You can learn recording production and create new music daily. I guarantee that you will never be sorry about the success of you music as long as a another track is in process. This morning a jazz track was rejected for an op, and I created a new sitar and tabla track which is being listened to by a music supervisor right now. It may get the gig or not. Either way, both tracks will be in a dozen libraries within a few months. It may take years for either to get a 

placement. It is a very long game. 

This is a business. This is YOUR business. Businesses can require investment in time, products, equipment, education, etc. I have consistently invested in my businesses since the beginning. Some have succeeded. Some have failed. I will say, I have led a full life. I have and generally do enjoy what I do. That is success to me. The dollars simple help pay for the enjoyment. I have had help. That's why I try to help others. 

Good luck! Believe in your music. Take a walk and listen to it. Others will too. 

I was offered a 2-year songwriter/publishing contract with a publisher out of Nashville. The contract states that I will pay half of the recording costs ($6,000/4-songs) for them to professionally record my songs with their players; I would sing. The songs would then get pitched to TV/film, etc. CW 

You are already recording professional music. You have a band. If you really want to create your own solo brand, then hiring pros to back you up, getting arrangements created, recording in a high quality studio would take money, whether you did it yourself or let a company do it for you. 

The idea of a publisher is rarely to charge the artist to cover costs, although typical deals have historically had upfront advances to the musician. If the record company didn't make money, the artist might have to pay back the advance. It was like a loan to keep the musician afloat while the company was developing them. In the end, record label deals are extremely tricky. I would hire a music lawyer to look over the contract (and that might cost you $500!). They would probably say, be extremely careful. I really can't say whether this company can do anything for you or not. What is their track record? Have you talked to other artists that have done this, and asked if they were successful? How much money did they make? If you can turn $6K into $60K, sure. My guess is it ain't gonna happen. 

Red flags are all over this. It is very rare for a publisher to ask an artist to pay to participate in a deal. Any company that believes in you, should have enough confidence that if THEY invest in you, THEY 

will make money. This sounds like a way for a company to make money off of you, and get their studio engineers and studio musicians some employment. I can believe in Nashville, there are tons 

  

of musicians that have no band, have no recording tools, no business skills, etc, that would agree to 

of musicians that have no band, have no recording tools, no business skills, etc, that would agree to this arrangement, in belief that they will become a star.
This is still the short answer! 

If I had $6K to spend, I would create my own studio ($500 and up), hire my own musicians (or barter!), and educate myself about recording, music business, etc. I would have my own publishing (register with BMI/ASCAP). There would still be money left to join orgs like TAXI, go to their free for members convention (Nov), put my music in zillions of music libraries (FREE), and basically create a career in this. http://edhartmanmusic.com/resources_for_composers_and_songwriters/ for a long list of things your can do!!!! 

You can certainly hire a promoter, business manager for an hourly fee ($10-25/hr), but you can also learn how to do everything yourself. The bonus of educatiing yourself, is that when you are successful, you will know all of the jobs you need done, so when you do hire someone, you can make sure they are doing the job correctly, and not being ripped off! 

Bottom line, unless a company can guarantee you will make money on your investment, it is a HUGE risk. $6K in the stock market is probably safer! 

One more pay to play deal!! 

I did some tracks with a friend and we solicited a music library. They said they would place the tracks in their library for a $50 ʻservice feeʼ. (to cover metadata, box.com, digital agreement) Non- exclusive. One-year. 60% of upfront sync fee goes to you. You would see writer/publisher royalties on the back-end from your PRO. What do you think on this? JC 

You can certainly get your tracks in plenty of libraries for free. I just went through my list on my website and updated it. Othewise, hard to say. If the library had an impending deal they could easily take the fee out of the sync. The meta is something that libraries do or have the composers do all day, everyday. Theres really no big cost to accepting a track. I have paid fees like this, if there was s pretty high sync fee or connection to be made. Its a bit of a gamble. The 60% sync to you is better than most (50%) and you keep your publishing. The seems a bit high. $20 would be more in line. Get more info about the company. I would do BBB research. 

Keep the questions & comments coming, and I will answer as best as possible. (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously) 

LINKS OF THE MONTH: 

Hey-I gotta make money, too! If you have learned anything from these newsletters please check out my SWAG! 

Ed Hartman MusicSWAG! 

https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/ 

Ed Hartman Patreon Page: (Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter!) 

https://www.patreon.com/edhartman 

Tech Links: 

An In Depth Guide To Meta-Tagging Your Tracks For Stock Music Libraries 

BIZ: 

10 Tips to Get Your Song Noticed, Heard, and Synced 

https://themusicsolution.songtradr.com/2018/05/07/9-tips-to-get-your-song-noticed-heard-and- synced/ 

Syncblog: 

https://www.synchtank.com/blog/ 

Ed Hartman Consultation 

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up) 

One hour: $70.00
Two hours: $120.00 Groups: contact for price 

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 

Joke/Quote of the week: 

If no one decided to try blend blue and red, there would be no purple! Fusion is necessary in order for music to evolve. 

Louie Talan 

WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT 

Contact Information: 

            

Ed Hartman 

Adventures in Music Licensing August 2018 Vol. 6, No. 8

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

August 2018 Vol. 6, No. 8

 

 Announcements: 

*  Still hot in the Pacific NW!  Going to the Washington coast to cool off this weekend.  I hope it is cooler where you are!   

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter) Look deep into this newsletter.  There are some real gems of info here.

* I continue to meet individually with folks that have taken my licensing class, along with newbies.  The info is continually changing (as you can tell from this newsletter!)  You are welcome to schedule a time to meet.  I prefer to meet in Edmonds, in my studio.  We can take a listen and analyze at your music for licensing potential.  I have time most days, including weekends.  Fridays are best.  Phone and Skype are available for those people not in the Pacific NW.

The next music licensing class is in the fall, Oct 20, 2018.  Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic! 

* If this newsletter has helped you, please check out my Patreon page. https://www.patreon.com/edhartman  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter! 

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    

 

Recent adventures in licensing: 

* I am continuing to create a LOT of tracks.  Songtradr and TAXI are pretty busy with requests, and I get more and more briefs (requests for music) from supervisors and libraries (some of which are also supervisors). 

* Songtradr - I have a number of tracks shortlisted, and in final selection.  (Supervisor is listening).  I am patiently waiting for something to get through!

* As I reported, we dropped Comcast TV, and went to Roku for streaming.  The only problem is you eat up a ton of data (going over costs $$$) -we still have Comcast for data - cheap, though!  We invested in a digital antenna (We tried 3 different ones!  Go with an outdoor, if you can.  Best Buy is pretty good with easy returns).  There are 30-50 stations that are broadcast over the air!  I had no idea.  There were 3-4 when I grew up!  There are great retro stations (ME TV, Decades, etc.) that I though were only on cable.  Anyway, we should be able to keep our data in control, but still have access to a lot of cable-type stations.  I can see why streaming will be the future (unless there is a lot more cable competition).  In regards to licensing, being able to watch TV shows is a big part of what we do, I'm afraid, but remember, all of this is tax deductable!

I finished the Canadian webseries! (see last month for the story) Got paid!  Here's some samples, below (Videos will be available on YT soon).  These were scored to picture (which is not easy!), but the deal was a license, so I can reuse the tracks anywhere.  You may notice, the scored tracks can be shorter (You only need to score what you need, rather than create a full track). TIP: You might create a longer track, for better use, elsewhere.  I did do that will some other tracks for this series.  The Carmina track got me the gig.  I did it in a few hours. From the client: "You work fast....almost freakishly fast."

A la Carl Orff, Carmina:

http://edhartmanmusic.com/orchestra_band_classical/s/end_times

A la "Gone with the Wind":

http://edhartmanmusic.com/orchestra_band_classical/s/in_love_at_last

*  New really fun tracks, that are in pitches, currently.

50s Muzak: (Guaranteed to make you smile!) 

http://edhartmanmusic.com/filmtv_theme_novelty_reality/s/the_springs_in_your_step

60s Muzak:

http://edhartmanmusic.com/jazz_fusion/s/out_on_the_town

Satriani style guitar-rock: (from a brief)

http://edhartmanmusic.com/rock/s/dreams_of_green

 

Tales from the Tech-Side:

*  I was seriously running out of space on my MacPro (garbage can tower).  It only came with a 256G SSD.  I had trouble upgrading.  I wound up adding another SSD drive, along with a few other regular drives (EW instruments, etc.).  The computer was down to just a few GBs left.  I did a lot of research, and finally invested a few bucks into "Clean My Mac".  WOW!  Really easy.  It got rid of 200GBs out of 250GBs!  My MacMail had been eating away, daily, at my memory.  I really recommend this.  I let it take the junk out every few days.  

 

Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

How do I make sure I get paid royalties from a film or TV show?

When a production company licenses a track from you (or you score-to-picture a project), a "cue" sheet needs to be filled out.  I always try to get a copy of the cue sheet, to check it over.  It should have:

Name of production, with contact info.

Name of track

Writer(s)

Publishers (you or another)

Length of usage

You can get forms from your PRO (BMI, ASCAP, etc.).  The cue sheet goes directly to the pro you are in, and becomes the connection between the production company, you and the PRO.  When the project is broadcast on TV, (or internationally in theaters), the information is tracked, and then sent to your PRO.  They figure out the percentages, and pay you your royalties(in 9+ months!).  

Do I need my credits on the film or TV show, visually to get paid?

No.  The cue sheet is the key to royalties.  I do recommend that you check your credits on the film (Title, Writer, "Courtesy of" Publisher).  It may be of help with your PRO if there is any confusion on the royalties.  Also, if the credits are incorrect, that may signal that the cue sheet is incorrect.  This happened to me years ago with an HBO show that was on a LOT during the holidays.  I lost years of royalties because my writers credit (my name!) was incorrect on the cue sheet.  When I started to wonder why I wasn't receiving royalties on this show, I looked at the credits (I have a VHS copy), and that told me something was amiss!  Your PRO will only go back so far to pay back-royalties.  In my case is was a costly mistake!  

Also, I always put my credits on my Youtube videos.  That may protect me, a bit, to make sure YT knows these are MY tracks.  I use AdRev.com for adrev royalty collection on YT.  They can "whitelist" your channel, so you can use your own music on your channel, and other creators can't on their own monetized channels (without royalties going to you).  

Finally, make sure IMDB has your credits (you can help them with editing!)

Keep the questions & comments coming, and I will answer as best as possible. (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously)

 

LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Ed Hartman Music SWAG! https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/ - Check out my latest:  https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/designs/write-repeat-forget-i-forgot

Free Shipping* to 7/19 at 5 PM CDT!

Code: FREESHIP718

Tech Links: 

5 Essential Items For Your Home Studio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aysTuQRIIPE

BIZ:

3 Key Steps For Music Licensing Success

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYpEGBJp0Do

Syncblog:

https://www.synchtank.com/blog/

 

Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 

 

Joke/Quote of the week:

If you don’t make mistakes, you aren’t really trying.

Coleman Hawkins

 

WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT

Adventures in Music Licensing, July 2018 Vol. 6, No. 7

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

July 2018 Vol. 6, No. 7


 Announcements: 

* OK. It’s hot.  80s and 90s.  For us in the great Pacific NW, it’s hot.  I know, we’re wimps.  I grew up in Chicago.  I know heat.  But frankly, I don’t need that kind of heat.  How’s your weather? 

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter) Look deep into this newsletter.  There are some real gems of info here.

* I continue to meet individually with folks that have taken my licensing class, along with newbies.  The info is continually changing (as you can tell from this newsletter!)  You are welcome to schedule a time to meet.  I prefer to meet in Edmonds, in my studio.  We can take a listen and analyze at your music for licensing potential.  I have time most days, including weekends.  Fridays are best.  Phone and Skype are available for those people not in the Pacific NW.

*  The next music licensing class is in the fall (TBA).  Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic! 

https://www.campusce.net/nscc/Course/Course.aspx?c=2117  

* If this newsletter has helped you, please check out my Patreon page. https://www.patreon.com/edhartman  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter! 

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    


Recent adventures in licensing: 

* Man, I have been busy this month.  I have probably created a dozen or more new tracks.  It is possible to get briefs from music supervisors and music libraries.  You need to ask, though.  I probably get at least a few a week, right now.  Some have been very interesting, and may yield some good results.  

* Here’s an adventure:  I was checking out FB for filmmakers.  There was a project out there looking for licensing info about a famous piece of music.  There is a lot of confusion about how to be able to use it.  The piece is Carmina Burana (O Fortuna) by Carl Orff.  The piece sounds old, so everyone thinks it’s public domain.  It only SOUNDS old!  Orff died in 1982, so it definitely is not public domain (PD). 

I got involved into the discussion, and double checked the piece.  There was an illegal version in a music library (I made the library aware of it.  They pulled the piece, and thanked me.  It could have been a disaster for all parties in a license situation!).  The piece itself would need a sync agreement from the writer or publisher.  Any recordings would need a master agreement from the publisher that owned that particular symphonic recording.  Either would be expensive, and most likely way about the project budget.  There was some discussion of “Latches” - common law principle that holds that if a rights holder does not enforce a property right, they loses the right to deny public access.  I’ve never heard of it in music.  The music biz would never allow it! IMHO  

I mentioned that I do create music, and may be able to come up with something quickly and within their budget.  I did create a nice track, that same day (Client: “You work fast....almost freakishly fast.”)  They invited me to work on the rest of the project! I did 4 episodes.  I’m just about done, and working on paperwork to get credits, cue sheets and payment.  I’ve made a great connection with a production company, too.

* Songtradr is putting a lot of opps out regularly.  You need to check daily, even a few times a day.  I have a song that was shortlisted and went to final consideration.  I am waiting on whether it was accepted right now.  Fingers crossed!  The monetization may be a good idea for anyone interested.  I may even look into distribution, although I can use CDBaby.    Like TAXI (I have also been busy there, too), Songtradr does motivate me to create more tracks regularly.  Even if they don’t make the placement, most tracks end up in a library, eventually.  My biggest challenge is feeding libraries I am already in.

* We dropped Comcast recently, and went to Roku, with YoutubeTV along with a lot of free channels (an entire channel for Asia Martial Arts Movies!)  It has been an education.  There are an AMAZING amount of weird little channels out there, that need music for their content. I’m starting to see why there are so many networks on my PRO statement.  Speaking of royalties, BMI Day in June was pretty good.  Some highlights:  $30 from "Audience Network” - ?? for my 2012 Henry Cavill flop movie.  $232 for “The Blind Side” (Made in 2009 - still cruisin!) on MTV (both writers and publishing thanks to musicsupervisor.com).   $45 from a Canadian TV series.  In general, HULU seems to be paying better than most streaming services.  

*  I did this track yesterday in a few hours.   The reference was a Penguin Cafe track. It got shortlisted and then immediately rejected for final. All in the same day! I did get a new track out of it, and have it in other libraries. What a rush. https://www.songtradr.com/songs/ed-hartman/energy-cycle

One more... One of my new favorites - For a publisher.  This is a pitch to an opening scene Cops and Robbers film.  They wanted a slightly vintage rhythmic piece.

The Caper (Afro-Cuban 6-8!)

http://www.edhartmanmusic.com/latin_world/s/the_caper


Tales from the Tech-Side:

*  I invested in EastWest Pianos (on sale, the best one with four pianos, and lots of mics),  That has really paid off.  I was getting a lot of negative critiques until I switched.  My piano tracks are a thousand times better than the Logic pianos (they are pretty good, though).  For solo piano, or piano lead, you have to have better. 

Comparison:

Logic Piano:

http://www.edhartmanmusic.com/keyboards_piano_organ_harp/s/the_inner_self

EW:

http://edhartmanmusic.com/keyboards_piano_organ_harp/s/the_swan_new_mix_bose


Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

I always make a mix to the highest within reason. Right now I mix out of Logic to 24-96. Then I make lower res files as needed. 24-48 16-44 are typical. I've had network clients use 320 mps3 for TV! Background music doesn't need it. Start high and be ready. You won't hear a lot of difference between 44 and 48. When I listen to Logic play, I believe it is at 192 I do hear the difference on reference speakers. I will predict the standard will get higher. 44 was set by Phillips for CD production. The story is they wanted to get Beethoven's Ninth Symphony on one disk! Urban myth? Best advice, think ahead. Your masters will be around for awhile, be ahead of the curve.

Is production music starting to affect film scoring?

I do both production music and film scoring. I've had cues used in films that were underscore. In the end, the same tools are used, the same skills, and looking at a film or show from beginning to end, the soundscape is one. Reality TV can be 100% llcensed music, and nearly all of it becomes score. Reality is a huge percentage of broadcast. If you start to add all of the indie films out there that use licensed music as score, there may be a lot more there, too. I'm working on a web-series now that started off as a replacement cue for what would have been a licensed piece used as heavy comedic effect against the scene.  I’m now scoring the project.   It's all just music creation.

Keep the questions & comments coming, and I will answer as best as possible. (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously)


LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Ed Hartman Music SWAG! https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/ - Check out my latest:  https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/designs/write-repeat-forget-i-forgot

Free Shipping* to 7/19 at 5 PM CDT!

Code: FREESHIP718

Tech Links:

Do you know what Lufs are?

https://www.masteringthemix.com/blogs/learn/mixing-and-mastering-using-lufs

BIZ:

Free 3 Day Music Library Course:

https://www.musicforincome.com/FreeLibraryMiniCourseDayOne?r_done=1

Syncblog:

https://www.synchtank.com/blog/


Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 


Joke/Quote of the week:

Berlioz on Handel:

A great barrel of pork and beer.

Rossini on Berlioz's "Symphonie Fantastique":

What a good thing this isn’t music.

Beethoven on Rossini:

Opera seria is ill-suited to the Italians.  You do not know how to deal with real drama.

And you think your returned critiques are bad!


WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT

Adventures in Music Licensing, June 2018 Vol. 6, No. 6

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

June 2018 Vol. 6, No. 6

 

 Announcements: 

* A bit of June Gloom has set up in the PNW.  Generally, it’s been a warm Spring.   How’s your weather? 

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter) Look deep into this newsletter.  There are some real gems of info here.

* I continue to meet individually with folks that have taken my licensing class, along with newbies.  The info is continually changing (as you can tell from this newsletter!)  You are welcome to schedule a time to meet.  I prefer to meet in Edmonds, in my studio.  We can take a listen and analyze at your music for licensing potential.  I have time most days, including weekends.  Fridays are best.  Phone and Skype are available for those people not in the Pacific NW.

*  The next music licensing class is in the fall (TBA).  Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic! (https://www.campusce.net/nscc/Course/Course.aspx?c=2117).  

* If this newsletter has helped you, please check out my Patreon page. https://www.patreon.com/edhartman  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter! 

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    

 

Recent adventures in licensing: 

On Friday, June 1, 2018, I went to the “Upstream Summit”.  This huge music event, created by Paul Allen is the Pacific NW’s version of SXSW.  The “Summit” is a mini music business conference.   It is in it’s second year, and has already evolved a bit.  Last year the Summit was at the WAMU Convention Center, in between the stadiums.  At that event, it was a bit noisy with panel’s next to each other.  This year, probably due to size and noise issues, the event was moved to four separate spaces in Pioneer Square (where the music stages are, too).  It took a bit of hunting to figure the spaces, but they were all within a block or so.  Each was a fairly large meeting space, with stages, lights, PA, etc.  There is an Upstream App, and it helped with scheduling and maps.  Because parking was a bit more of a challenge (there was a discount lot for $14 for the day), I took the Sounder Train right to Pioneer Square.  It was great, and worked well with the schedule.  The morning had a networking event in a Starbucks All Ages Club (next to a Starbucks, of course!).  Lots of folks, FREE pastries, coffee and juice.  (Worth the event admission!).

There were many events at three other spaces to choose from.  I attended panels about contracts, business, and licensing (there was a Music Supervisor on the panel!).  I was able to meet with panelists afterwords and exchange contact information.  (That is not always possible at these types of events).  There were other panels on Music Community, Touring, Metadata, Home Studio Recording (not technical), and putting a band together, etc.  A number of organizations had booths.   I bopped around a bit from panel to panel, and caught parts of many of them.  Overall, it was well produced, with plenty of seating.   There were mics for all panelists, it was quiet, and the PA systmes were great.  Each panel had 100-200 folks in attendance.  Overall, I would guess there were at least 500 in attendance. 

I did also attend the ending speaker, Krist Novoselic (Nirvana).  He is exceptionally well-spoken, and has had an amazing career.  I was able to meet him, along with Paul Allen, and even a local politician, Dow Constantine (introduced Krist) afterwards.  I brought plenty of PR, and met with many musicians and music biz folks.  For $25, it was a deal.  Well recommended for musicians, songwriters, composers, bands, music business agents, managers, etc. 

A note about music networking.  You really can’t be a fly on the wall.  You have to meet with everyone.  Best advice, as others what they do.  Don’t focus on yourself.  Offer advice and ideas.  The point is simply to establish a relationship with other folks in your industry.  Over time, everyone can help each other.  You just have to give folks what they need.

* A few more $ from some libraries floated in for small micro-licenses.  Just keep submitting!

* I have been working on custom tracks for a number of clients, along with pitches to TAXI, Filmmusicnet, and Songtradr.  Check out this spy track I did a few years ago.  They were looking for some modern spy music.  I also submitted some retro tracks, but this track did get shortlisted.  Fingers crossed!  PS:  The original track was only a :30.  I also submitted an alternative :60.  A little copy and paste goes a long way.  I tried to put the tracks back in Logic, but the audio was coming out differently.  I wound up editing the track in Sound Studio, a simple mastering program.  You can also add metadata, normalize, compress, etc. 

My Spy:

https://www.songtradr.com/user/catalog/master/edit/overview/1438302

* Well, I created a track for a well-known library that is extremely challenging to get into.  They took the track.  I filled out all the paperwork, and received a contract for it.   I just received an email saying they can't use it because it is too close to another track.  The track was created in a specific composer's style/genre. On the positive side I guess it means I can sound a lot like that composer.  This particular track does follow typical blues form, chords, boogie bass, etc.  I have put the track elsewhere and really don't expect any issues.  I do understand the abundance of caution these days.   Things are blurry enough, nowadays.

 

Tales from the Tech-Side:

I mentioned last month about storing everything in other drives (small space on my Apple Mac Pro).  I just moved my Logic samples to the drive.  These video made it very easy! (watch BOTH!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkAKLkd190A

watch this for the info about SymbolicLinker!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsj2BWXJ8cc

 

Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

Is there any issue with also registering with Harry Fox? I was sent a link to this form from Spotify, I assume neither "Music Reports" nor this link are exclusive publishing administration agreements? (BG) 

My only experience with Harry Fox was when I needed to paid upfront to do a cover of a song on a album.  (LP!) It was a limited run, so I paid a certain amount based on the amount of albums I produced.  If my music were being covered by someone else, I would probably use Harry Fox to arrange a mechanical license.  This is no to be confused with sync licensing.  Sync licensing is where your actual track is being added ("synced") with video, film, media, etc.  You are giving the producer of the new creation license rights to use it.  A "mechanical" license is for someone to make a new version of your music.  SESAC bought Rumblefish and Harry Fox.  Rumblefish does sync licensing and collects contentID for Youtube, etc.  

Here's an info page on Crucial's website:

https://www.crucialmusic.com/page/music_101

I know that with digital sales, "mechanicals" are now in play.  How, I am really not sure.  Anyone want to chime in?

 Do you know anything about “Music Reports”? (BG)

"Music Reports"  - I really don't know much about them.  They seem to also be collecting revenue from a variety of sources.  It seems because of the wide variety of royalty income, companies are trying to be to place to go to collect this income.  My guess is, unless you are a large company they are not worth pursuing, and may have consequences with music libraries.  I just don't have enough information, as this stuff is very new.

When do I send “Cue Sheets” to clients? And this allows me to collect royalties or what is it for? And I only send them to the actual client, not to the library, correct? (Doesn't the library ensure we get our royalties?) (BG)

The cue sheet is generated by the production company or music library, typically.  Im this case, Audiosparx let's me hold on to my publishing.  That means I get to chase down the publishing royalties, if it is something for broadcast (TV, etc.)  Audiosparx emails me the cue sheet, and I get it to the client, and need to make sure they forward it to my PRO.

Most of the time with libraries, they will take care of cue sheets (and keep publishing, including retitiles).  Even a library needs the production company to get the cue sheet to BMI or ASCAP.  Both of those orgs have cue sheet templates you can get.   Here's BMI's info (downloads here, too)

https://www.bmi.com/creators/detail/what_is_a_cue_sheet

In the end, you rarely will create a cue sheet.  It is a list of all the music on a program or film.  It is the responsibility of the production company to produce, and forward to a PRO.  Say, if a music supervisor put a track in a show or film, they would make sure to create a cue sheet of all the music in the production.  I always ask for a copy for my records.  I might even check with my PRO to make sure it was submitted.  

If you are scoring a film, it is a good idea to get a cue sheet, though.  Most directors don't know how it works.  In fact, it reminded me, I need to get a cue sheet filed for the film I just scored.  Each short cue of music will be labeled.  The idea is it sets up the timing of each "cue" or track.  It's unlikely that this film will every get on broadcast TV, but you never know.  I keep my publishing with most low budget scores, so I will get all of the backend.  With scoring of big budget movies, the production company will probably want publishing.  It is then in their best interest to get the cue sheet to the PRO, because they will get part of the backend.

Here’s a response from MusicSupervisor.com regarding their “PRO” membership (I’ve never done it).  They are a library, and you don’t have to pay anything to have your music in the library.  This is an excellent library that lets you keep all of your publishing (for ethical reasons! – very rare these days!)

1) Priority Song Approval: We get hundreds of songs uploaded every week; each one listened to by our staff. Pro Member tracks are approved first -- usually within a day.

2) Licensing Lounge: Includes detailed reports -- Listen to the songs being pitched at this moment. Hear most active songs and new tracks being approved.

3) Licensing Overview: Charts show searches and license by genre, projects by type and month, and daily activity.

4) Your Licensing Activity: Your most active artists and songs, yearly overview, detailed breakdown of each song/track activity (date, listen, for what kind of project). Also a

5) Retail store activity overview and breakdown including earnings.

Keep the questions & comments coming, and I will answer as best as possible. (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously)

 

LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Ed Hartman Music SWAG! https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/ - Check out my latest:  https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/designs/write-repeat-forget-i-forgot

New video on Youtube, below.  I put together a montage of TV theme music from my library.  It was a lot of fun.  Check it out! https://youtu.be/mfM2NlPFlok

Tech Links:

EQ Theory For Beginners: Part 2

https://youtu.be/NbwF-F4Yu3A

BIZ:

This guy is AMAZING!  Subscribe to his channel.  Christian Henson Music

https://youtu.be/pIXSMMEb-zU

Synctank!

https://www.synchblog.com/

Get help building your REEL:

https://reelcrafter.com/

 

Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 

 

Joke/Quote of the week:

"If I should ever die, God forbid, let this be my epitaph:

THE ONLY PROOF HE NEEDED FOR THE EXISTENCE OF GOD WAS MUSIC."

“Virtually every writer I know would rather be a musician.”

“Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand.”

Kurt Vonnegut

 

WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT

Adventures in Music Licensing May 2018 Vol. 6, No. 5

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

May 2018 Vol. 6, No. 5


 Announcements: 

* Spring has sprung in the Pacific Northwest! Finally some 70s, sunny weather. 

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter) Look deep into this newsletter.  There are some real gems of info here.

* I continue to meet individually with folks that have taken my licensing class, along with newbies.  The info is continually changing (as you can tell from this newsletter!)  You are welcome to schedule a time to meet.  I prefer to meet in Edmonds, in my studio.  We can take a listen and analyze at your music for licensing potential.  I have time most days, including weekends.  Mondays and Fridays are best.  Phone and Skype are available for those people not in the Pacific NW.

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, May 12, 2018, 9am to noon.  Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic! (https://www.campusce.net/nscc/Course/Course.aspx?c=2117).  

* If this newsletter has helped you, please consider becoming a fan:  I did start a Patreon page.  This is very new to me, and I have a lot to learn about it.   My page is (https://www.patreon.com/edhartman)  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter! 

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    


Recent adventures in licensing: 

I finished a score for a short film, “The Lost Wallet”, recently and got to see the film at a local private showing.  It was great to hear the music sync’d with the images! It should be released in the coming months.  I have another short coming from the same production company.  I did just take a crack at cleaning up the soundtrack (dialogue) for the film.  I mostly used EQ to take out ambient sound (hum, hiss, etc.)  Search for frequencies, and take-em out! It’s not easy!

I just received notice from Audiosparx for a small placement in an African Animation Series for kids.  It was an old track of mine in the Looney Tunes tradition.   Not big money, but its nice to see placements still coming thru there.  I do control publishing so I was able to email the client (send them a cue sheet)   Because I keep the publishing, Audiosparx does let me get to know the client for future custom work.  The email a “Cue Sheet” to send to the client.  Here’s the track:  “Very Merry Melody”  This is not the placement, but a recent video I created using Buster Keaton footage (PD) The track was done with Roland keyboards, xylophone, drums, and a TASCAM 8 track digital recorder (pre DAW)  https://youtu.be/1czf55ZPduE


Tales from the Tech-Side:

One of the challenges of working with my MAC Pro (trash can tower) is that it came with a 250GB Flash Drive.  I have added a number of external drives.  If you are running something like this, put your open project on the main drive, when you are working with it.  Otherwise, there can be some overload problemsI am storing nearly everything, including my iTunes music on external drives. https://www.imore.com/how-move-your-itunes-library-external-hard-drive 


Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

Note:  This question is not directly about music track licensing, but any PR we do to get licensing going is worth pursuing!

What tools in iMovie are you using to put in things like the penguins; the old jazz movie; etc.   When you say images and video are creative commons or public domain, where do you get them from? - B

I list them in the credits of the videos and in the description with links.  Pixabay.com is easiest.   You will become addicted. Register with them. No fees.  It makes it easier to download.   If something looks more commercial check it out.  Most of what I see looks good for use.  Occasionally you might see a clip of image that has an obvious commercial image in it.   99% works.   You don't have to attribute it and can use it commercially.   Old public domain films are harder to figure out.  Unless something is pre 1923 it can be still under copyright.  There are 1000s of films that are of, including government stuff like NASA footage.  

CC is Creative Commons (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons).  There are different levels, but in general, it means creators allow you to use their images (or music) for free, including commercial use, depending on the license (double check!)  Images are also good to use for your tracks.  More and more portals and libraries want images in the metadata with the track.  I can add pics to my tracks via Sound Studio https://felttip.com/ss/.

https://www.pexels.com/photo-license/

https://pixabay.com/

https://images.nasa.gov/

https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/

https://unsplash.com/collections

https://archive.org/

https://freephotos.cc/couple

About licensing “Sheet Music”! Great info! Thanks. From L:

I found Sheet Music Plus Press has a section in their catalogue for folks to upload their own arrangements!  You make about 45% of the profit on each piece sold.  But here’s the cool thing....they have a list of contemporary tunes for which they have already cleared the copyright!  You can submit arrangements of those tunes as well!  

This site looks pretty good for folks like me that don’t want the hassle of managing a web site, handling taxes, or securing copyright permissions.

Keep the questions & comments coming, and I will answer as best as possible. (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously)


LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Ed Hartman Music SWAG! https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/ - Check out my latest:  https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/designs/write-repeat-forget-i-forgot

New video on Youtube, below.  I put together a montage of TV theme music from my library.  It was a lot of fun.  Check it out! https://youtu.be/mfM2NlPFlok

Tech Links:

Free Metatag Generator:
https://tagsgenerator.com

More Metatags:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1RSemkHG1uqTcAbmJWwuYMrDTgcXgV6Z8Sl9epSFy9tA/htmlview#gid=0

EQ Theory For Beginners: Part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbc8RllCAE8

Music Production Software:

https://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/software.html

Music Supervisors Directory: (Your welcome)

http://www.songwriteruniverse.com/music-supervisors-directory.htm

How to Optimize Production Workflow With DAW Shortcuts And More

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38RsS7BBZmk

BIZ:

Music in Play: Beginner's Guide to Sync Licensing - Tips and Tricks of the Tradehttps://www.musicgateway.com/blog/how-to-guides/962/Music-in-Play-Beginners-Guide-to-Sync-Licensing-Tips-and-Tricks-of-the-Trade?utm_source=Music+Gateway+Email+List&utm_campaign=5baf1443e6-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_04_09&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_99a0583fda-5baf1443e6-29155201


Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 


Joke/Quote of the week:

Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity.

Charles Mingus


WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT

Adventures in Music Licensing April 2018 Vol. 6, No. 4

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

April 2018 Vol. 6, No. 4

 

 Announcements: 

* The rainy spring continues in the Pacific Northwest.  We’ve had a few days in the 60s, but not enough!  More sun.

* New videos on Youtube, below.  There's a Mancini tribute ("Penguins on Parade", a romantic theme ("Our Love"), and cinematic jazz ("Swinging in the Starlight").  All with interesting images and video (Imovie!)  If you have a cable TV provider with voice control, say “Ed Hartman, Yutube”.  It works! Channel ID: https://www.youtube.com/user/edhartman1

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter)

* I have had a number of individual consultations.  Thanks to everyone.  It's amazing how many folks are seriously getting into music licensing!

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, May 12, 2018, 9am to noon.  (https://www.campusce.net/nscc/Course/Course.aspx?c=2117).   Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic!

* If this newsletter has helped you, please consider becoming a fan:  I did start a Patreon page.  This is very new to me, and I have a lot to learn about it.   My page is (https://www.patreon.com/edhartman)  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter! 

* I am doing more and more one-on-one consultations (in person, skype or phone). If you are not in the Pacific NW, and would like to get info, please email me (edrums@aol.com) Let me know what you are interested in talking about (licensing, contracts, exclusive vs. non, writing, tech, etc.) and we can schedule a time to talk. My fees are below. If you just have a short question, you can always email it for a general answer in the next newsletter. Please let me know if I can be of help!

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    

 

Recent adventures in licensing:

I am happy to report a great placement!  One of our favorite Critical" libraries placed “Football Funk” in NBC’s Rise last week.  I only received a few days notice before it was on.  The payment is good (although I probably won’t see it for a bit) and the royalties should be excellent, considering it is primetime.  Here’s the link for the episode: (“Victory Party” S1, E4) The music comes in 13:07-13:28 during the football game, as the students are telling each other about the party.  It’s in the background, about 20 sec.

Here's the episode: 

https://www.nbc.com/rise/video/victory-party/3692616

Here’s the track: (for reference)

http://edhartmanmusic.com/orchestra_band_classical/s/football_funk

The scene is really close in style, editing, dialog as the football scene in “The Blind Side”  My track is nearly in an identical place in the scene, too.  The track was also featured in the film "Scooby Doo: The Mystery Begins", (both Warner Bros.), Capital One (ad), and an ESPN fall radio promotion leading up to the Super Bowl.  Talk about a payoff! 

New film-score coming!  Film is almost done.  Preview screening in a week! More coming.

This is the best time of year for BMI.  Quarterly payments happen a bit faster! 

Latest BMI payday highlights:

“Cold Light of Day” (tepid 2012 thriller, a la “Taken” with Henry Cavill (pre-Superman) continues to pay well around the world, in spite of a horrible theatrical run. 

Good $$ from reality programs (Ultimate Homes).  They may not pay anything up front, but watch for the royalties!

A track of mine is in “Killjoys” (S3, Ep 1: “Boondoggie”) a Canadian production, now on SYFY.  It’s just starting to pay off.  Note credit under "Soundtracks".  I add these, myself to IMDB, when necessary.  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6072892/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt

Stay in touch with libraries. I needed to check on a payment with a library, and also asked about what they need.  I got back a few links of music that are especially in demand.  Ask and ye shall receive!

Songtradr.com(free or membership) I did go after a 70K ad listing.  Here’s my track: https://www.songtradr.com/user/catalog/master/edit/overview/1407964

Musicgateway.com    (tier membership) Not a lot of new ops. I have gone after quite a few, waiting.

 

Tales from the Tech-Side:

After getting battered pretty well about some solo piano tracks, I invested in EastWest Pianos when there was a 50% off sale! (Thanks for the tip, Doug!) The four pianos included have a ton of ways to mic, add special reverbs, added pedal options, and incredible sampling depth (The full version comes on it's own HD)  Well worth it, considering how often piano is needed in music.  The Steinway in Logic is very good, but has fairly noticeable changes in velocity.  Some pretty harsh tones come up (more intense harmonics).  I did throw the problem out to FB, and one person called Logic's piano settings as either bright or super mellow!  I was able to tame it a bit, by using the “Velocity Limiter” in Logic.  You can bring down the higher velocities as a group, rather than going through the notes one by one.  In an ensemble, you don’t hear this as much, but as a solo piano, it can be quite problematic.  One recommendation: If you get it, get the best version from the start.  I got the cheaper one, and then wanted to upgrade.  I had to contact EW (it took a lot of emails through support and sales).  The upgrade path would have cost me quite a bit more, compared to the sale price.  Anyway, be careful about prices.  The website doesn’t show differences in versions on every page, too.  I love the software, but it can be a bit confusing to purchase.

Also:  I added a 2nd screen to my set-up!  I had an extra LCD, and just needed to get the correct Mini-displayport to VGA adaptor.  My Mac Pro has enough slots for 6 screens!  Once I got the screen reset to the correct source (a bit mystifying without the remote), I was able to set preferences, and viola, I just move the curser from one screen to the other.  I can't believe it took this look to do this.  It gives you a ton more screen real-estate.  You put your DAW on one screen, and video on the other for scoring, etc.  Heartily recommended!

 

 

Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

When someone tells you they're sending you a "schedule" of your song, in the licensing world what does that mean? (B)

Typically a "Schedule A" (like in taxes) from a library is a list of your songs with pertinent information.  When you sign a contract, that allows the library to license your music, in general.  It usually says, "See Schedule A".  Libraries can then have you send additional Schedule A's as you add songs, rather than redo a contract for each one.  It is extremely typical in music libraries.

What is your experience with these folks at Music Dealer currently? Are they still working well  for you? (B)

Music Dealers liquidated in 2017, but came back.  There were stories about composers not getting paid, etc.   I just started to look at them myself.   I know of a number of writers that did ok with them.   There may be reasons to be careful with them, though.  My lists are not necessarily endorsements.  Things change too quickly in this biz!  

Does TubeBuddy have things for your channel that boost traffic and subscribers or is it just advice on how to do it yourself? Wasn't sure what you meant about optimizing. And do you have a link to the free version? (B)

Tubebuddy is a web-browser plug-in that assists your Youtube channel.  I'm just using the free version.  The subscription has a ton more things.  I've been using TB mostly analysis.   It has great tools to help with meta (seaches other channels and raids the meta!)  There's a simple checklist that pops up to tell you if you are doing basic stuff.  I may go to their membership, if my channel gets re-monetized.  

Where do you store files? (B)

Besides my own website, I use box.com (FREE - larger files for a fee).  Basically I store mp3s on box and send aif, wav, and video on wetransfer.  You can create folders, and have others either listen or download files by invitation.  It’s ideal for private and personal communications.

CD Baby has on their site that licensed music can't contain samples (including bird sounds etc.), royalty-free loops, or other loops. I've also seen this on licensing sites. I called CD Baby and they said they're including things like Garage Band, which people thought gave you the right to use royalty-free loops. I had my music friend check with her lawyer, and he interpreted it a little different, but I do know I've seen on licensing sites that you can't use bird sounds, etc. that you got elsewhere. What info do you have on this because you mention taking samples from Logic EX24? (B)

It sounds like this is CD Baby's licensing option.  I stay away from it, because of issues with music libraries.  Usually, samples mean other peoples tracks, like when folks sample music from another source, like an old record,etc.  Even sound effects need to be public domain or creative commons to use.  For my alien tracks I did found creative commons sounds to use.  I know that libraries and PROs will ask this question.  Music sample libraries like EastWest or samples within Logic are meant to be used in the composers project.  You would have to eliminate every sampled sound out of the box in a program.  That would make most composers music unusable.  It has to mean samples of copyrighted material incorporated in your project.  You are not allowed to sell samples from your software by themselves.  You have to do something with them, and make them part of another work.  That may be what they mean, too.  In other words, you can't take a bird song, and just mix it as a bird sound, to sell as finished work.  Your license agreement with Garageband, Logic and any DAW or library will state this as well.

Keep the questions coming, and I will answer as best as possible. (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously)

 

LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Ed Hartman Music SWAG! https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/

Speaking of SWAG - Ever listen to Harry Shearer’s Podcast, Le Show?  Fantastic stuff.  His alter-ego, Derek Smalls (Spinal Tap) just released this:

http://harryshearer.com/le-shows/april-08-2018/

Check out “Gimme Some (More) Money".  Gotta have that merch!

Tech Links:

How to Correct Vocal Timing Issues Using Flex Time

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNltXxCJPtU

Music Production Tutorial: How to Remix a Song Effectively - Part 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaeJU00gIcg 

Scoring films!

https://www.spitfireaudio.com/editorial/features/scoring-a-film/part1/

BIZ:

Never give up your writers share!

Production Companies Benefit When Composers Keep their Royalties

https://craigstuartgarfinkle.blogspot.com/2018/04/production-companies-benefit-when.html?m=1

* New Podcast Interview:  (In depth interview. A bit more about my percussion side.) 

https://soundcloud.com/user-229717478/petes-percussion-podcast-episode-75-ed-hartman

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/petezambito.com-pete-zambito/id1133586337

http://petezambito.com/petes-percussion-podcast-the-episodes/2018/1/28/petes-percussion-podcast-episode-75-ed-hartman

 

Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 

 

Joke/Quote of the week:

“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.”

Claude Debussy

 

WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT

Adventures in Music Licensing March 2018 Vol. 6, No. 3

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

March 2018 Vol. 6, No. 3

 

 Announcements: 

* Spring is on the way!  It’s gonna be in the 60s in the Pacific NW!

* Thanks to everyone that subscribed to my Youtube channel!  I was able to get 1000 subs by the deadline.  YT did de-monetize me, although my channel is under review, and should be remonitized in the near future.  It was a lot of work, but I did learn a lot about YT, especially how tags really move you up the suggested  video list.  Also, Tubebuddy is a wonderful browser plug-in (free version) that does all sorts of things to optimize and analyze your channel .  I recommend it.  There were a ton of YT videos on increasing subs and traffic.  The YT community is quite a group.  Tens of thousands of small channels subbed to each other.

THANKS!  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f099YNuFub4

Channel ID: https://www.youtube.com/user/edhartman1

* I have a SWAG shop!  You can now get cool T-shirts, mugs, and other gift items.   I’m putting designs out regularly, of music (especially percussion) and recording based ideas.  This company (threadless.com) is one of many that prints on-demand.  You set up a shop, upload designs, and they do the selling.  You set the price.  It’s kind of like a music library!  Anyway, keep an eye on this.  It’s another form of royalties.  It’s a nice secondary way to create stuff, too.  You can really work on your brand (check out my Ed Hartman Music logo.)
https://edhartmanmusic.threadless.com/

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter)

* I have had a number of individual consultations.  Thanks to everyone.  It's amazing how many folks are seriously getting into music licensing!

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, May 12, 2018, 9am to noon.  (https://www.campusce.net/nscc/Course/Course.aspx?c=2117).   Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic!

* If this newsletter has helped you, please consider becoming a fan:  I did start a Patreon page.  This is very new to me, and I have a lot to learn about it.   My page is (https://www.patreon.com/edhartman)  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter! 

* NW Composers: Look on FB for Seattle Composer Alliance Monthly Meetups! They will move around, so keep your eyes open. seattlecomposers.org - Update:  I will be at the Wed, 3-14-18 (7:30pm) meetup at Blue Star Cafe in Seattle!  See you there. Best info:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/seattlecomposers/

* I am doing more and more one-on-one consultations (in person, skype or phone). If you are not in the Pacific NW, and would like to get info, please email me (edrums@aol.com) Let me know what you are interested in talking about (licensing, contracts, exclusive vs. non, writing, tech, etc.) and we can schedule a time to talk. My fees are below. If you just have a short question, you can always email it for a general answer in the next newsletter. Please let me know if I can be of help!

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    

 

Recent adventures in licensing:

Songtradr.com  (free or membership)is doing a lot at the moment.  I have a number of friends that are getting blanket deals (retail music services, etc.).  These services pay directly (quarterly) and can add up.  You need to get them a lot of music, though. 

Musicgateway.com   (tier membership) has been working hard, too.  Like Songtradr, they are creating more opps for higher membership levels.  I’m not ready to recommend that .  Pay to play is always risky.  Opps that go to specific requests (movies, TV) can only take one track from all the submissions.  There’s a lot of music out there.  For libraries and blanket agreements, the client takes hundreds or thousands of tracks.  Your success rate should be a lot better.

It’s all about the little $$.  CD Baby came through with a small payout for digital sales.  It’s nice to see something! I also got a small payout from Triplescoop Music (great little library – Note:  Tare now asking for music that is not monetized on Youtube)

My last licensing class was great.  Thanks to all who attended!  I’m finally figuring out the PC in the classroom! (I’ve been a MAC person since the first Macs)  Of course, it helped when I got the right password!

I’ve been regularly getting more tracks in Crucial Music.  It’s a tough library to get tracks in, but they are one of the best, and will let you follow who they are pitching to.  I do know of a lot of writers that collaborate, and get more music in this library.  They tend to like “source music”, like jazz and background music that might be heard in a restaurant.  

I’ve been using box.com (free) to shop tracks.  I can create a folder, and exclusively email a client tracks to check out and download.  The free version has limited storage (I use wetransfer for larger files).  Box is great for pitching though.  I use it like soundcloud.  Box is als good for allowing directors to temp your tracks (try them out in a scene).  Temps are a great way to get music into a film.  Temps may become placements, if the director can't find a better fit.  Music editors look for temps, too!

I have been pitching to TAXI listings a bit.  Forward percentage is up.  I am waiting on responses (not as much, though). I still recommend TAXI, especially if you can make the RALLY (free for members) in the fall.  If you are going to join, call (don’t do it online) and mention my name for three free submissions.

I am seeing more multiple sightings of pitches between platforms (TAXI, Musicgateway, Songtradr, and other music sources like libraries and supervisors).  There have been situations where my digging got better information that what was out there.  You can find supervisors on social media, but it does take quite a bit of digging.  I have been pitching to one supervisor directly, and it feels a lot better knowing the track is getting to the gatekeeper.  Keep your eyes OPEN!

I am working on a few different projects directly with clients.  Through FB, I was able to connect with a writer/producer and create some alien sounds (see tech below) and trailer music for a book, etc.  It was more of licensing arrangement.  There was no picture to score against.  I was generating tracks on request.  I did a number of them for the client.  Payment is on it’s way!   I should have one film done within the month, and another to start soon after.  There’s a great scoring film link below, for those that are thinking of scoring films (especially bigger budgets).  It’s a bit intimidating, but the point is you need a team to do it!

I have been submitting to some very exclusive libraries.  I have gotten some revealing reviews back.  There is another level of tracks being generated by composers, especially with hybrid-orchestral music.  You really have to have state of the art sounds and production level to be successful with these companies.  I am now rethinking how I can get to that level.  Go to the library you are submitting to, and really listen to similar tracks.  There is a reason those tracks are in the library. 

If you want a laugh, google youself along with the words "net worth".  If you are like me, you will get an interesting surprise.  One company bases it's information on IMDB credits, I'm guessing.  When your IMDB credits are up, your net-worth seems to goes up!  I wish it worked that way. 

 

Tales from the Tech-Side:

A pitch to a client for alien sounds and music taught me a lot about sampling.  Within Logic, is EX24.  It has a great sampler in it. It’s a bit tricky, but you can go to Youtube for plenty of tutorials about using it.  I was able to find audio sounds of animals (free, and free-use). You can just put the audio on the timeline, and manipulate it with effects, EQ, modulation, etc.   With a sampler, you can upload the audio tracks up as samples. By creating a sample with it, you can play the sound on your keyboard.  The sampler allows you to spread one of more samples across one of more keys.  The results vary.  I was able to create some cool singing whales, and really scary squids!  I may sample some of my acoustic instruments next, so if I am recording audio, and need to fix something, I might be able to put a sample version along side it for editing.

Recent request from a library that works with reality music:  This gives you an idea of the versions they might need.  If you have old tracks without versions, send them to the library.  For new tracks, this is a good start.  Do your versions when you are in a DAW session.  You don’t want to have to go back.  Funny things happen (can’t find the original audio, etc.)

light tension (comedic-tension), dramedy, pizzicato themes, quirky

All tracks must have stem/alternate versions with hard stops:

full length (1 min-to 1:30)

30 sec version

bed/no melody version

very sparse version (bass & perc)

stinger version (5 sec)

Good luck!

 

Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

I have a question regarding copyright permissions for pop tunes arrangements.  I occasionally create short arrangements of pop tunes for some of my beginner/intermediate piano students to play.  I was considering offering those for sale to piano teachers on a website.  Even offering to do custom arrangements with a quick turn-around time.  I’ve done a little bit of research toward this and I’m thinking the administrative work in getting permissions to do Bruno Mars, Ariana Grande, etc tunes would be HUGE!!!  I’m totally put off by the work involved for copyright permissions.  

Am I right or am I creating a mountain out of a mole hill? (L)

I've always stayed away from covers for recording or sheet music because of this. Getting rights is tough, and unless you can offer a ton of sales, the very large publishers involved really don't care.  

What you might do, is contact publishing companies about working for them doing arrangements.  You can send them samples.  Hal Leonard and Alfred would be a good start.  I would look at their catalogs, and see what artists they have (see similar products, sheet music and method books).  Coming up with a catchy book of arrangements for a certain level, concept, music style, etc. might be of interest.  You might make more money, and they would do the PR.  The downside, is expect a fairly low commission (10-15%).  That's publishing!  Doing it yourself will get you more, but getting the rights maybe tough.  Maybe there's some new companies that do online sheet music sales only.  They may pay better.

I'm not really sure where you check for sheet music publishing rights. 

from Harry Fox (where you get recording rights):

The Harry Fox Agency does not offer print rights; however, you may secure print rights by contacting the publisher directly. (Use a PRO to find the publisher)

I think I heard you say that a clean original and engaging instrumental track would be more marketable than a track tied to a specific lyric or story. (J)

The less specific the lyrics are, the more marketable it is to media (attaching it to another project).  If you say, "I love Lisa" that really limits it's usage.  "I love my girl" would be more generic.  Places, times, people, etc. all pigeon-hole a song. (J)

Would posting both a lyric version & an instrumental only side by side in a library help sell the mood and potential for the instrumental track to a client who does not  want to be tied to a specific story?  (J)

Having an instrumental bed is there for the editor to play with.  They can use it under dialog.  Having an instrumental with a melody, could be a stand-along track, or could be used in an edit with the lyric version, or could be a reprise of the song later (or earlier as a foreshadowing of a melody).  Broadway musicals do this all the time.  Think like a director.  How would you use your song, if you had several versions?  Many lyric songwriters make more money on instrumental versions of their tracks, too!   

Or is that counterproductive by mentally gluing the track to a story that doesn't fit his purpose?  (J)

I would not worry about that.  Give the director options.  The more generic the better.  Of course, if a director, or music supervisor wants a specific song, with a specific name, or place reference, that will be part of the brief.  

Read these books to answer these questions...(Dean is a tremendous songwriter, and TAXI member)

https://www.amazon.com/Demystifying-Cue-Thoughts-strategies-competitive-ebook/dp/B00MR2MPBG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

https://www.amazon.com/Demystifying-Genre-Dean-Krippaehne-ebook/dp/B01JXPB1QE

(This was a question I got on FB from a film director about using score music in another production)

As a composer do you typically handle all the contact as far as getting a certain song for a project? Also, do you use some of your own work more than once if it fits different projects?

Good questions.  Typically, a score composer focuses on the underscore.  The music that creates the emotional under-bed of the film.  It's usually most of the music.  On occasion, a film might be full of licensed music (pop tunes, etc.) with some underscore to link everything together.  With composers being able to create so much themselves (rather than hiriing orchestras, recording studios, musicians) it's possible to create something quite good from a home studio.  I can "score to picture", and sync my music as I write it.  If there is sufficient budget, I can send the music to live players to record as well.  This is all part of the scoring process.   That is usually plenty for a score composer to be responsible for.  A music supervisor might be hired (or the composer can do this job on a low budget film).  That person will find specific tracks that might be needed beyond the score.  If John Williams writes the music for a film, he may not want to worry about a pop song in the middle.  Also, pop stars and record companies from all eras have used films to promote their music in media.  Anyway, getting clearance for this music can be tricky.  Master and Sync agreements need to be signed by all parties.  Usually you pay for these tracks in your film, above and beyond your score.  They can be cheap or extremely expensive.  If you can't afford a star (50K and up) you might use an indie ($100 and up!)Whatever you do, the agreements for the score and any music you use need to be done carefully.

Regarding using music in another project, it is possible.  One way to keep your music cost down, is to license the music in your film, like you license a song.  That gives the composer other ways to make money with it.  Big companies, like Warner Bros, buy out the score (work for hire) from the composer.  It may be iconic (like Star Wars).  Usually those companies have their own publishing, and can make use of the soundtrack as a CD release, or license it elsewhere with related products (games, TV, web, media, advertising, etc.)  Wow, that's a lot of shit.  Anyway, I do offer a licensed score option to fillmakers as a way to keep the price down.  Unless you are making an iconic film (with a big budget)  the score really isn't important for the filmmaker to own.  When a production companies hires the composer, they will own the music.  If they license it, the composer can use it elsewhere, but it can be a lot cheaper.  Many things to get into!

Keep the questions coming, and I will answer as best as possible.  (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously)

Thanks, and good luck!

 

LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Tech Links:

Vocal Production Tutorial: How to Add Texture with Reverb and More

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCQdNaBfmGI

Getting PRO sound:

https://audioskills.com/episode/5974/

Audio mixing VOO-DOO:

https://audionamix.com/products/xtrax-stems/

BIZ:

CD Baby buys Adrev: (will be interesting!)

http://musically.com/2018/01/10/cd-babys-parent-company-buys-adrev-dashgo/

6 Tips On Writing Music For Film and Television

http://themusicsolution.songtradr.com/2017/11/02/6-tips-to-writing-music-for-film-and-television/?utm_source=Songtradr+System+-+Users&utm_campaign=6277d713b6-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_01_17&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_dc9f15e1ff-6277d713b6-563451077

Comparing PROS:

https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2018/02/20/performance-rights-pro-ascap-bmi-sesac-soundexchange/

Music licensing on YT:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJd_f5zzAEs&feature=youtu.be&app=desktop

NARIP:

http://www.narip.com/?page_id=13095

Make your own online library:

http://www.komposed.com/

* New Podcast Interview:  (In depth interview. A bit more about my percussion side.) 

https://soundcloud.com/user-229717478/petes-percussion-podcast-episode-75-ed-hartman

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/petezambito.com-pete-zambito/id1133586337

http://petezambito.com/petes-percussion-podcast-the-episodes/2018/1/28/petes-percussion-podcast-episode-75-ed-hartman 

Joke/Quote of the week:

If a composer could say what he had to say in words he would not bother trying to say it in music.
Gustav Mahler

 

WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT

All contents © 2018 Ed Hartman

Adventures in Music Licensing February 2018 Vol. 6, No. 2

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

February 2018 Vol. 6, No. 2 


Announcements: 

* Happy Mardi-Gras/Carnaval season to everyone!  

* I woke up a little under the weather, today(actually pretty nice outside!) As I felt better, I got inspired to do a "Hopeful Piano" track for a pitch.  It came out pretty good!.  Use anything for motivation.

* I have a MAJOR request…As you have probably noticed, this newsletter and information are free. I’m quite happy to continue with it.  In exchange for this free service, I have a very small request.  What would really help me at this moment, is for all of my readers to go to my Youtube page and subscribe.  It costs nothing.  Youtube is upping the requirements to maintain ad revenue for small channels (#smallchannelarmy).  My channel is a few hundred subscribers away from 1000.  I have until Feb 20, 2018.  If only a percentage of readers on this newsletter subscribed, I would be there!  The channel does have a video about my licensing class, and a number of music videos I have been creating to showcase my tracks.  (That’s a discussion in itself!) There’s also a ton of videos from my drumshop that closed, along with percussion how-to-videos. A tuning video has over 81K views!  

New intro video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQfU1_bFqSQ

Channel ID: https://www.youtube.com/user/edhartman1

About the scourge:  https://youtube-creators.googleblog.com/2018/01/additional-changes-to-youtube-partner.html

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter)

* I have had a number of individual consultations.  Thanks to everyone.  It's amazing how many folks are seriously getting into music licensing!

* New Podcast Interview:  (In depth interview. A bit more about my percussion side.) 

https://soundcloud.com/user-229717478/petes-percussion-podcast-episode-75-ed-hartman

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/petezambito.com-pete-zambito/id1133586337

http://petezambito.com/petes-percussion-podcast-the-episodes/2018/1/28/petes-percussion-podcast-episode-75-ed-hartman

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, Febrary 24, 2017, 9am to noon.  (https://continuinged.northseattle.edu/courses/make-money-licensing-your-music).   Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic!

* If this newsletter has helped you, please consider becoming a fan:  I did start a Patreon page.  This is very new to me, and I have a lot to learn about it.   My page is (https://www.patreon.com/edhartman)  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter! 

* NW Composers: Look on FB for Seattle Composer Alliance Monthly Meetups! They will move around, so keep your eyes open. seattlecomposers.org

* I am doing one-on-one consultations (in person, skype or phone). If you are not in the Pacific NW, and would like to get info, please email me (edrums@aol.com) Let me know what you are interested in talking about (licensing, contracts, exclusive vs. non, writing, tech, etc.) and we can schedule a time to talk. My fees are below. If you just have a short question, you can always email it for a general answer in the next newsletter. Please let me know if I can be of help!

* I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    


Recent adventures in licensing:

Big recommendation...Make lists of tasks.  There are unlimited licensing opps out there.  Keep folders marked with emails and task-lists for each client, etc.)

I am looking into Soundreef.com.  A friend has done well with it, so I did start the process of uploading tracks. Soundreef is a Italian company that supplies music to background retail, etc.  They won a major legal decision that allowed they to collect direct royalties of this particiular type of licensing, that normally would have gone to the Italian PRO.  Anyway, they are a type of music library.  I am still figuring out a few things.  They are non-exclusive, and it seems OK.  They do have some online paperwork, including an “exoneration letter” to your PRO (BMI, ASCAP, etc.) that allows them to collect a very specific royalty in certain countries.  It’s a bit confusing.  I’m still trying to get an answer about the “master recording” their royalty form.  I should have more information next newsletter.  Best guess is it will create a new income stream, especially if you can submit a few dozen tracks. 

Songtradr and Musicgateway both now have optional memberships.  I can see benefits for either.  There are still free pitching opps for both.  Both show the clients they are pitching to.  In one case, I did find that I can pitch directly.  With Songtradr, that does mean that I won’t pay a commission on sales to that client.  Keep your eyes open!

I just uploaded nearly a hundred new tracks to a few libraries.  It felt good to get up to date.  One library did offer to do the metadata!  You bet they can do it.  It can take 15-20 minutes per track.  They are a lot faster than me, especially with genre, etc.  One library is working with me closer on custom requests.  I think the large upload put me on their front burner.  Use high volume to attract and renew clients!

It’s all about the little $$.  Createspace (Amazon) does books and CDs on demand.   I did get a nice little royalty check from them.  I recommend using them for CDs rather than producing and stocking CDs.  It totally takes the risk out of the deal.  You can use them along side with CD Baby, etc. (don't use the CD Licensing option!  It can conflict with other licensing opps!)

More and more, I am seeing the same pitch from multiple sources (libraries, portals, and individuals).  Even if you see a deadline on a pitch, don’t believe it.  I have had a number of pitches that were over the deadline, and then popped up somewhere else.

Lots of forwards via TAXI.  Responses from clients have been very light, I’m sorry to say.  This has become a bit of an issue in the TAXI community.   I don’t know if it’s just that there’s more being pitched, or the clients are using multiple portals to get tracks.  I still feel TAXI is a good investment, if you can get to the Rally in November. 
Lots of new tracks – Jazz, new Spanish Guitar, sad strijngs, solo piano, funk, new cool jazz track for an exclusive library.

Finally, TAXES are so much easier without running a retail music store!  I am free…


Tales from the Tech-Side:

Timesaver!  Typically, I start my sessions with a custom template (LOGIC).  Inevitably, as I play with all of the settings, including master mix stuff, the settings get more complicated.  I just did a solo piano track, and copied a similar session to start from.  Voila! I didn’t need to reinvent the wheel again.  The piano sounded great, and I didn’t need to change a thing.  If I’m smart, I will build a new template from that session specifically for piano.  Just remember, you can always start with a previous session that had settings you like!  Just remember if there’s any tempo changes, etc. already in there.  


Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

If I'm going to give someone an "Exclusive" shouldn't I get something in return? Or, shouldn't it at least be a very well known organization with huge sucess stories like APM (owned by Sony?)

The songs I was going to send this company (three) are all under contract with non-exclusive agreements that I've signed, one is a three-year whereby I can opt out after three years, and the other is with a major network deal where I can opt out in one year.

Do you recommend I pick a few songs that are not contracted for (and less likely to be) or should I just stick with non-exclusive deals? Or, should I ask for something in return, and if so, what is it? I certainly don't want to give an exclusive for more then one year. I know APM has a one-year deal.

Some libraries start off non-exclusive, and become exclusive, or have both types of deals.  I have given both non and excl content to the same library.   I always recommend to be careful with excl., if there is no upfront money paid (when you give the library your music).  Some excl. libraries will get blanket deals.  They make money, by selling the whole library to the client (like Discovery networks).  They may or may not split any of the revenue to the composers. The back end may be good though.  Where it gets sticky, is if the backend is with something like Scripps network, where they DON'T pay any backend.  So understand - NO upfront paid for the track, NO sync fee paid from the client, and NO back-end.  Theoretically, the client might direct license to the library and pay backend that way. The library needs to pay you, of course, which may or may not happen.  That is a worst case scenario.  NO money on the placement.  On the other hand, it might open up doors that pay well.  

Let's get practical:

Exclusive is always tricky.  I go with exclusives, if they ask me for something specific for a client.  I figure the chances are good that I'll get the placement.  I also ask, if the client does NOT take the track, can I get it back for another non-excl pitch.  Sometimes libraries will let you take the track back, if no placement.  But, many libraries will make you sign on the track excl. when you pitch.  That's because they need to contract to legally represent the track.  

I generally do NOT send a library a already non-excl track to someone, if they only want exclusive.  I might email a link to a non-excl track to an excl library, and say, "I can create something like this track (although that track is not avail). "

I recommend asking the library exactly what they want.  Genre, length, instrumentation, style, etc.  Then I will create something specifically for them, that you I can live without.  I will say, the last few tracks that were suppose to go to an excl. wound up going to a non-excl.  

Some libraries are extremely particular, and will send out their needs regularly to composers.  Some libraries will also list ALL of the variations they would love to have (with strings, with perc, no percussion, etc.) It can take serious time to do a dozen variations on a track.  Serious film/TV composers (especially reality) do the extra work, and send all of the track variations.  They can get a lot of work.  

Should you go with exclusives?  Yes, if they pay upfront for the track or, if they revert back to non (3yrs is typical), or if they have something particular.  Otherwise, I generally stick with non.  Some non will have an exclusive custom division, too.  

In the end, it is all about relationships.  If you become friends with the companies you work with, things are a lot easier to work out, and they will seek you out when they need something from your wheelhouse.  

APM libraries (there are a number of them that work with APM) are extremely difficult to get into.  They may be worth it, if you are ready for them, and vice-versa.  Some huge excl. really want your entire catalogue.  That is probably impossible if you are already involved with non-exclusives.

-------

Hi Ed, I know you do a lot of "cues."

What sites do you market those through? Do you put them in libraries?Portals like Songradr? How do you market these? 

I would guess they typically don't pay much, easy to put together and another source of income. Maybe $25.00 to $200.00 per cue plus the royalties?

How long do they need to be? Two minutes in length?

On yours, I assume you use your own instruments as a base (like guitar/marimba) and then add other instruments electronically?

The quick answer is cues = tracks.  No real difference, except cues can be defined as writing music specifically for film and tv, rather than your tracks that also fit film and tv.  Pay can be same or different, or more or less. Budget determines price. A reality cue might pay no upfront (only backend, which can add up) or can be used in advertising and pay $50K!  

I use everything for everything, equipment-wise.  If you want to write orchestral you need to either hire an orchestra or learn to create one on computer (not easy at all!).  I just got a track rejected from TAXI because my strings weren't realistic enough.  I agree.  My composition was fine.  

Usually I start with electronics for format and then add acoustic instruments to liven it up, or make everything sound real.

I don't distinguish any real difference in market for cues vs. tracks.  I really see them all the same.  Cue is a terminology that is probably from film or TV scoring.  In the end, a track is a track.  Music libraries sell both film scoring type tracks as well as regular songs and instrumentals.  Music libraries started off by selling "source music" - like when a radio is on in the scene, and they need a song playing.  It was called "needle=drop".  Nowadays, libraries are asked to score entire movies or TV shows.  One library can have an extremely wide variety of musical styles and needs.  

Generally, most scoring cues are probably used for TV, commercials, and trailers.  The specifics of them can differ.  I've had requests for 60 sec, 1:30, 2:00 and beyond.  In general, 2-3 minutes is tops.  Because editors are going to work with these tracks, having edit points helps.  Those are easy places the track can be cut and pasted.  When you are designing this kind of track, you probably want to think about sections.  (15, 30, etc.)  If your tracks are at 60 or 120 BPM, it's very easy.  Otherwise, as you create your first musical phrase, just keep in mind at the end of a section, the music will trail off a bit.  There doesn't have to be silence, but a good drop of volume does the trick.  Reality TV is really what this type of track is useful for.  Editors will use tons of tracks to build a show.  Listen to shows to hear the variety of music.  The will need tension, suspense, humor, sad, happy, and neutral tracks to score the program.  

I use Sound Studio on Mac to look at my mixes and see where the breaks are.  I just did a track, and put some cymbal swells in at the breaks (I used electronic cymbals, too!).  When you look at the mix, you see the sections easily.  Each section is somewhat similar but instruments are added and taken out to create theme and variations.  It's really like giving the editor 4 tracks in one.  

That's just one type of track.  Trailer music can build over the entire track. Trailers are using muiltiple tracks, but in the end, there is a style to it.  I'm not a trailer expert, and it is a difficult style to get into.  There are specific trailer libraries to market to.

One great use of TAXI, is the pitches have a lot of this information on them.  The clients ask for specific types of tracks.  TAXI more than any other pitch portal gets specific on these kind of pitches.   

I can recommend that you can use Music Library Report to get information about libraries (link on my website).  Going to music libraries and listening to tracks can answer a lot of questions.  

There certainly is a need for relaxing instrumentals for just about anything.  I've had tracks used by libraries and in TV and films that were never designed for anything in particular.  They were semi-improvised pieces!  In summary, I wouldn't get hung up on trying to create anything specific, beyond what you are comfortable with.  When you want to challenge yourself, and create something with a needed form, style, instrumentation, genre, etc., go for it.  Otherwise, focus on what you are great at.  If you analyze your existing tracks for length, etc. you may discover there is a market for them beyond what they were created for.  I use a variety of pitching portals (taxi.com, musicgateway.net, songtradr.com, etc.).  I can tell you that most of the time, I get inspired to write a track through these companies.  A lot of the time, the track doesn't get the initial pitch, but does get used by someone else.  Once you create a track, an entire world seems to open up, and you see the possibilities.  So often, within a week, another potential client will be looking for the same thing, or very similar.  Write, Submit, Forget, Repeat.

-------

We are signed-up with Songtradr.  We have many tracks uploaded. Meta is next.

We upgraded to pro, which is very cheap, I also put our songs under all the monetization categories. They have a special deal ($4.99/month) I'm a little afraid that they now have the songs to play freely, to try to get them licensed, so why would anyone pay us? Did I do the wrong thing, or is that how it's done? Are they legit or should I worry that I have just basically given away our music?

I don’t think you need to worry about Songtradr.  I’ve used it for pitching up to now, although I do have one track in one of their background music companies.  

As far as having your music playing anywhere, don’t worry about someone using it.  They would have to license it through Songtradr.  In your browser (like Chrome) you can under file, go ingognito  and go to Songtradr.  You’ll see what it looks like for someone else to see your songs.  You will see they can’t just download them.  

Even if you have music that is downloadable somewhere, it doesn’t mean anyone can legally use it, without your permission or license.  (you can get blank license forms.  I have some.  Contracts can’t be copyrighted, so you can use nearly anyones - just take the text and put your company’s info in.  I don’t worry about folks using my music on personal videos.  It will never add up to much, even on Youtube, with ad revenue.  Commercial productions will never use your music without proper licensing.  They can seriously be sued, and they know it.  If anything, they bend over backwards making sure you have all the rights.  They prefer to work with licensing companies, like Songtradr, or music libraries, because the music clearance is done correctly.

I’ve thought about the Songtradr deal right now. I know of some very successful pros that are using it.  I will say not to depend on anyone company.  Check out music libraries, and pitch to them.  As long as they are non-exclusive, it won’t conflict with anything.  You will learn as you go.  Use the TAXI forum for questions, too.  Musiclibraryreport is also full of info about libraries.  

Keep the questions coming, and I will answer as best as possible.  (I may use them in my newsletters, anonymously)

Thanks, and good luck! 


LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Tech Links:

Crash Course in Logic Pro 10.4 Updates and Features:

https://audioskills.com/post/5970/

BIZ:

About library music: (Great stuff!)

https://www.soundonsound.com/music-business/all-about-library-music-part-2

About music for commercials:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/x5szcya024j0jml/josh%20and%20mark2.mp4?dl=0


Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 


Joke/Quote of the week:

About failure…

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

Thomas Edison

“My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with failure.”

 Abraham Lincoln

“I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”

 Michael Jordan


WRITE/SUBMIT/FORGET/REPEAT

New Podcast Interview!

Adventures in Music Licensing January 2018 Vol. 6, No. 1

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

January 2018 Vol. 6, No. 1

 

 Announcements: 

*  Happy New Year to everyone!  I hope everyone has survived the holidays.  I am looking forward to 2018 as a full-time composer (and a little teaching!). 

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter)

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, Febrary 24, 2017, 9am to noon.  (https://continuinged.northseattle.edu/courses/make-money-licensing-your-music).   Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic!

* I did start a Patreon page.  This is very new to me, and I have a lot to learn about it.   My page is (https://www.patreon.com/edhartman)  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter. 

* NW Composers: Look on FB for Seattle Composer Alliance Monthly Meetups! They will move around, so keep your eyes open. seattlecomposers.org

* I am doing one-on-one consultations (in person, skype or phone). If you are not in the Pacific NW, and would like to get info, please email me (edrums@aol.com) Let me know what you are interested in talking about (licensing, contracts, exclusive vs. non, writing, tech, etc.) and we can schedule a time to talk. My fees are below. If you just have a short question, you can always email it for a general answer in the next newsletter. Please let me know if I can be of help!

* If you have any articles, links, ideas, etc. related to music licensing, please let me know!

* For anyone who has taken my licensing class, I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    

 

Recent adventures in licensing:

The Royalties keep a coming. BMI paid out week (Q2 2017).  I had a few new shows, including: “Real Housewives of New York City”, Ultimate Homes (Hawaii, and Islands).  The Hawaii one is on Youtube.  (You can now what Youtube on your TV with Comcast -  It’s an eye opener watching your own YT videos on your TV!) The Ultimate Homes shows (Discovery) paid over $100 for the quarter.  The Blind Side (2009) did nearly $100 on MTV alone.  The box-office disaster, Cold Light of Day (2012) with Henry Cavill (Pre Superman) continues to make good money, world-wide.  It paid $130 in Germany, alone, this quarter.  My goal for this year is to double or better my BMI payments. 

I am continuing to direct license music.  I connected with a filmmaker on FB.  He was looking, on his feed, for some music for a small Indie short.  Folks recommended cheap Royalty Free libraries.  I recommended he might try working with a local composer.  Knowing the cheap prices of tracks on libraries, we negotiated a low fee for two tracks.  I created a simple sync-master agreement, and the client will pay me on paypal. 

I am waiting to start scoring a short film that will be fundraising soon, to pay for the score.  The film is funny, so it will be a good challenge to bring the humor out of the dialogue and visuals. 

I I did find a music supervisor on social media, looking for music, and just pitched him a new arrangement of Saint Saens, “The Swan”.  It needed to be very virtuosic, which was a challenge (see tech below).  I’m waiting to see if it gets in the film.  It was great to work with a supervisor, directly. 

I spent a week uploading a ton of tracks to one of my favorite libraries, musicsupervisor.com.  They allow you to keep your publishing (no retitiles), and you get both writers and publishers share!  Bless them.  I’ve gotten a few very good gigs from them.  The upload system is good, but takes about 15 minutes per song to do metadata.  I uploaded 50 songs! 

There was a very challenging pitch I went after, last year, for a track similar to “The Secret Life of Pets” theme.  My track came out well.  Two of the pitching portals had it, but no luck with forwards.  I did connect with a library in the UK (where the pitch came from) and they did take the track for the library, and will hunt for the pitch).  Never say die.

Temp: (Meet the Pets)  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyvMUp7Vt5Q

My track:  (Swinging in the Starlight)  http://edhartmanmusic.com/jazz_fusion/s/swinging_in_the_starlight

 

Tales from the Tech-Side:

Tricks of doing virtuosic music on computer:

The first thing to understand, is that you can always slow the music down (if it is midi).  I mean REALLY slow it down, so that you can create it at your own pace.  I’m a pretty good improviser, so it’s easy for me to create accompaniments (bass, chords, arpezzios, etc.).  I can create complex runs, redo and improve chords, and edit in and out notes. 

You can find midi files to create your own music, but make sure they are from the original piece (pre 1923ish Public Domain).  A new arrangement may not be public domain.

I create a chart first, with melody, and then hand write chords to create a “fake” arrangement.  I may or may not use that track for the actual music.  It is usually quantized for notation.  Logic does a great job of quick notation, with little editing.  I wouldn’t use it for heavy publishing, but for quick charts it is great!  I use classical “fake” books too, to create classical arrangements. 

You can transpose midi, create multiple tracks (even if it is just simple piano), and use different ones.  That makes it easier for editing.

Tricks to make a track retro:

I just did a retro mix of a vocal track (40s style).  Izotope has a great FREE plug-in, Vinyl that can retro-ize your music.  I added a little recording noise at the beginning and end (loop from Logic), and presto, and old-sounding track.

 

Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

Do you recommend recording instruments on something like the Yamaha Clavinova or do you do your own recording with live instruments and use software to add other instruments?   Most importantly, if one were to use the Clavinova to lay down tracks including piano, guitar, etc., IS IT THE PRODUCTION QUALITY THEY NEED FOR MOVIES, T.V. AND COMMERCIALS? Or is just a demo?

My understanding is movies take the song "as is" to use, unless you're writing a custom score as if you're John Williams or something like that. The salesperson at the piano store tried to tell me movies always re-do our songs and therefore it doesn't matter if we're not production quality. I don't think he's right....

In music licensing, most clients are looking for finished recordings.  There are some situations out there, where music will be re-recorded, like if you are writing for another artist.   Even then, it's important to create a high quality demo recording.   Certainly, if you are scoring a very high budget film, the composer will create the score on paper, or more likely as a "mock-up" recording, using software instruments, etc.  A team of arrangers, orchestrators, musicians, and tech-folks will manage the recording.  Hollywood has had a history of "hummers", or composers that don't even read music.  They rely on a team to deliver the final recorded score.  John Williams still writes his scores on paper, but can orchestrate, conduct, and deliver a finished score.  It really is a cooperative effort, though.

Nowadays, with so much electronic scoring, and software available, modern composers have become the entire team (composer, arranger, performer, sound-design, etc.).  This is not necessarily a good trend.  Rather than perfecting their craft as composers, they may spend more time learning about technology (and spending a lot of money).  With sufficient budgets, modern high-tech composers do have teams to create their scores.  Hans Zimmer is an example of a composer that created an entire production company.  He gets tons of work, and consistently delivers extremely high quality work. 

The equipment is never as important as the musician, though.  Good songwriters and musicians always use the equipment at hand to the best of their skill level, or collaborate with others to get the right sound and arrangement.  You have two options working with others.  You can hire them (Work for Hire or WFH, in which you pay them something, along with a WFH contract, that releases them from any ownership of the composition or recording.  You can collaborate with them, in which you need an agreement on ownership.  

The answer to your question on whether a simple keyboard is enough to make music for media, really depends on the track you are taking as a composer.  Theoretically, if you really want to become a film composer and write the musical score for film, a simple keyboard might be fine, if you know how to orchestrate, or have software (finale, etc.) that can create the score.  You will need a serious budget and team to finish the process.  If you want to create individual tracks that a going to be pitched to TV, film, and advertising, you need a serious recording device  like a stand-alone recorder or a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) like Pro-tools or Logic.  You will need to learn all you can about the software, and how to engineer tracks.  You have to wear many hats.

A good keyboard that connects to your computer DAW is important.  It can be an inexpensive ($100-300) USB "controller" type that has no sounds on it.  All it does is trigger the sounds on the computer (virtually unlimited).  You can use a high quality master keyboard (like the Yamaha) that also connects to your computer.  You would have your choice of using the keyboard sounds and/or the DAW sounds.  

I have all of the above.  The keyboard I use most of the time, is my  trusty Oxygen 61 controller keyboard.  I do havea high quality Yamaha 88.  The sounds out the Yamaha are limited by very good.  I got both a decade or more ago.  I use the YAMAHA mostly to play-along with students (it has an excellent "split" for bass and piano).  I can connect it to my computer, but usually use the simpler Oxygen.  The Yamaha has a much better action and range, but the smaller one connects better to Logic.  I also have some older synthesizers, and a medium sized more modern Yamaha keyboard that I originally got for home, when my studio was at my store.  I haven't used it much since I moved it into the studio.  The sounds are very good, though.

Personally, the sounds on a computer can be amazing, and nearly unlimited.  Logic comes with a huge amount of sounds in the program, both electronic and sampled instruments.  You can buy "plug-in" orchestras (like East West) that add another dimension.  You can start with Garageband (free with a MAC) to start learning about this.  There are many free Youtube videos, and pay tutorial sites to teach you.  

You will need to learn how to record both audio and software instrument tracks, mix them down, master the recordings, and put them in the right format (mp3, aif, wav, etc.) for the clients.  

Is it overwhelming?  At times, yes.  Is it possible? Yes.  You will always be learning about music and technology, no matter what your goal is.  As complex as a DAW is, it can simply be a recording device like an old tape recorder.  One of the best  reasons to MIDI compose (trigger sounds in the computer), is that you can edit individual notes, slow the performance down, change the sounds later, copy-paste, etc.  If you need to compose fast, these tricks can really speed up your work-flow. Talk to other composers about their set-ups (on FB, etc.).  Better yet, start a local composers organization to share ideas.  Good luck!

 

LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Tech Links:

Mastering:

http://hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/3/e/2/3e2aeb583fd26d26/ASP038.mp3?c_id=18315725&expiration=1516136377&hwt=6431f0243d194f821f2d15fa1f2f0b4e

BIZ:

How To Land A Synch [a.k.a. song placement] In An Ad, T.V. Show or Film [Emily White]

http://www.hypebot.com/hypebot/2014/01/how-to-land-a-synch-aka-a-song-placement-in-an-ad-advert-tv-show-film-trailer.html

 

Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 

 

Joke/Quote of the week:

From New Year’s on the outlook brightens; good humor lost in a mood of failure returns. I resolve to stop complaining.”

Leonard Bernstein

Adventures in Music Licensing, December 2017

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

December 2017 Vol. 5, No. 12

 Announcements: 

*  Happy Holidays to everyone!

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter)

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, Febrary 24, 2017, 9am to noon.  (https://continuinged.northseattle.edu/courses/make-money-licensing-your-music).   Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic!

* I did start a Patreon page.  This is very new to me, and I have a lot to learn about it.   My page is (https://www.patreon.com/edhartman)  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter. 

* NW Composers: Look on FB for Seattle Composer Alliance Monthly Meetups! They will move around, so keep your eyes open. seattlecomposers.org

* I am doing one-on-one consultations (in person, skype or phone). If you are not in the Pacific NW, and would like to get info, please email me (edrums@aol.com) Let me know what you are interested in talking about (licensing, contracts, exclusive vs. non, writing, tech, etc.) and we can schedule a time to talk. My fees are below. If you just have a short question, you can always email it for a general answer in the next newsletter. Please let me know if I can be of help!

* If you have any articles, links, ideas, etc. related to music licensing, please let me know!

* For anyone who has taken my licensing class, I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    

 

Recent adventures in licensing:

I am continuing my experiments on Youtube.  I just put my entire "Marimbells of Christmas" CD (with video and images).  It will be interesting to see what the viewship will be.  I did put some educational videos together, and they have attracted some interest, with a little help from Facebook, Twitter and other social media (Topbuzz).  

 

For visual assets I am using Pixabay.com.  They have free usable video and pics (CC -Creative Commons).  You can use it for anything (including commercial use), and you don't have to put attributes (I am putting their website on the credits and comments).  Here's a recent video with pics and video from Pixabay:  https://youtu.be/ldXvotEvu6U?list=PLuihzQ3nbkeQisTXrSz0ojyfmnbQ7s0qz  I should have more info and results of this type of promotion in then next few months. 

Due to all that has been going on, I wasn’t able to attend the Taxi Rally in LA, this year.  I was very disappointed, and had a lot of friends there. Ironically, I did teach my licensing class in Seattle, the same weekend.  Of interest, a local representative of a music library took the class.   It was very close to a “Rally” type of event, where you have potential buyers and sellers in the same room!   Hopefully, I will continue to work  with this library in the near future. For anyone interested in submitting their music:  http://myhiptunes.com  This is a non-exclusive RF (Royalty Free) type library, where they sell tracks for multiple use.  (Client can use the same track for more than one project).  They do have a custom division for a select number of composers that can create very high quality music very quickly.   If you want to get some inside info, go to the blog: https://stockmusic.net/blog/ 

 

Tales from the Tech-Side:

Super Inexpensive, recycled percussion for your tracks:   https://youtu.be/96PbNxS-_G4?list=PLuihzQ3nbkeSQgY1w0Rio8bMtCFzfwuNV

Some non-studio tech ideas:

I am using sideline.com  to get my previous music licensing business line over to my cell phone.  It puts a second line on your phone.  It's under $10/month (was free).

I also used Numberbarn.com to store my retail number and add a referral message (& VM) to my other number and website.  Pretty cheap ($24/yr) and easy. Again, you need to port from your old phone company (before you make the change). 

I moved my Drumexchange.com website over to my teaching site, edhartmanlessons.com.  I hate to lose the brand of that domain.  It should keep me in the looping in the percussion sector!    I use register4less.com.  Good company, low price. 

I don’t know if this is helpful info, but it kept me from losing important brand assets.

One more web tip (Thanks Dan!):  You can embed Soundcloud tracks on your website.  Just get the embed code, and put the html on your site (look for the html editor).  It’s pretty easy and works well.  I did try it, but already have a truckload of music on my hostbaby.com site, edhartmanmusic.com.  I wish my site had the “waveform” look that Soundcloud does.  It’s important for clients to be able to listen  and view the track.  I am also using a free box.com account to store music and make accessible to clents (I can email specific links, and  download options).  There is a player built in, that is pretty cool.

 

Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

What is a “neutral” track:

That’s a piece of music that fits under the dialogue nicely.  It doesn’t get in the way, or take any of the audience’s attention away from what’s going on the screen.    It might be a track that can morph from scene to scene.  Stay away from strings and heavy pads. The mood is neither happy or sad.  This is a track of mine that seems pretty “neutral”: http://edhartmanmusic.com/new_age/s/rivertrance

 

LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Advice for home recording and mixing:

http://hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/5/a/3/5a3fc568468df715/ASP031.mp3?c_id=17336468&expiration=1510086604&hwt=f7854b2742c80ce9ad1dc4535b883167

BIZ:

A broad overview of 7 potential ways to make money in music:

 https://audioskills.com/post/4938/

 Trailer House Directory:

http://www.goldentrailer.com/trailer-house/

Talk to an expert (or be one!): ($)

https://clarity.fm/

Find unclaimed royalties:

https://www.royaltyclaim.com

 FREE MIX MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION!

http://www.cfmediaview.com/lp1.aspx?v=6_2632078714_119189_2

TECH:

What’s the Difference Between Stock Plugins and Premium Plugins?

 https://audioskills.com/post/5790/

 

Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 

 

Joke/Quote of the week:

“Jazz will endure just as long people hear it through their feet instead of their brains.”

 John Philip Sousa

Adventures in Music Licensing November 2017 Vol. 5, No. 11

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

November 2017 Vol. 5, No. 11 


Announcements: 

*  We had snow in the Pacific NW, in early November!  - A rare event.  Don't worry though, back to rain for six months.

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter)

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, Febrary 24, 2018, 9am to noon.  (https://continuinged.northseattle.edu/courses/make-money-licensing-your-music).   Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live outside of the Pacific NW, I am going to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic!

* I did start a Patreon page.  This is very new to me, and I have a lot to learn about it.   My page is (https://www.patreon.com/edhartman)  Feel free to support the effort!  Call it a voluntary subscription to this newsletter. 

* NW Composers: Look on FB for Seattle Composer Alliance Monthly Meetups! They will move around, so keep your eyes open. seattlecomposers.org

* I am doing one-on-one consultations (in person, skype or phone). If you are not in the Pacific NW, and would like to get info, please email me (edrums@aol.com) Let me know what you are interested in talking about (licensing, contracts, exclusive vs. non, writing, tech, etc.) and we can schedule a time to talk. My fees are below. If you just have a short question, you can always email it for a general answer in the next newsletter. Please let me know if I can be of help!

* If you have any articles, links, ideas, etc. related to music licensing, please let me know!

* For anyone who has taken my licensing class, I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below).    


Recent adventures in licensing:

I am spending a lot of time putting videos of my my existing music on Youtube (and posting on FB and Linkedin)..  My goal is to make the music better more likely to attract directors, music supervisors, etc.  I am getting views, and learning more about video production.  I use IMovie (Mac), and it is really simple to drop a track in, and create a quick video.  I am either using my own footage (from my LG Android phone, a Nikon still camera that does video, or a Zoom).  With stabilization, you really don't need to worry about shaky footage as much.  I use a tripod when I have one.  Simple pics of trees, animals, landscapes, and just about anything can be used.  Effects are very easy (see this video: https://youtu.be/MduYQDAXHkM?list=PLuihzQ3nbkeQisTXrSz0ojyfmnbQ7s0qz)

 An interesting experiment:  I created this baroque style track, by improvising on Midi-piano (a bit slower), edited and sped it up.  The piece came out quite well.  I put it to this video: (shot at a nearby bird city park/bird sactuary) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVm1yHzkR90&list=PLuihzQ3nbkeQisTXrSz0ojyfmnbQ7s0qz&index=9

For visual assets I am using Pixabay.com.  They have free usable video and pics (CC -Creative Commons).  You can use it for anything (including commercial use), and you don't have to put attributes (I am putting their website on the credits and comments).  Here's a recent video with pics and video from Pixabay:  https://youtu.be/ldXvotEvu6U?list=PLuihzQ3nbkeQisTXrSz0ojyfmnbQ7s0qz  I should have more info and results of this type of promotion in then next few months. 

Due to all that has been going on, I wasn’t able to attend the Taxi Rally in LA, this year.  I was very disappointed, and had a lot of friends there. Ironically, I did teach my licensing class in Seattle, the same weekend.  Of interest, a local representative of a music library took the class.   It was very close to a “Rally” type of event, where you have potential buyers and sellers in the same room!   Hopefully, I will continue to work  with this library in the near future. For anyone interested in submitting their music: http://myhiptunes.com  This is a non-exclusive RF (Royalty Free) type library, where they sell tracks for multiple use.  (Client can use the same track for more than one project).  They do have a custom division for a select number of composers that can create very high quality music very quickly.   If you want to get some inside info, go to the blog:https://stockmusic.net/blog/ 


Tales from the Tech-Side:

Super Inexpensive, recycled percussion for your tracks:   https://youtu.be/96PbNxS-_G4?list=PLuihzQ3nbkeSQgY1w0Rio8bMtCFzfwuNV

Some non-studio tech ideas:

I am using sideline.com  to get my previous music licensing business line over to my cell phone.  It puts a second line on your phone.  It's under $10/month (was free).

I also used Numberbarn.com to store my retail number and add a referral message (& VM) to my other number and website.  Pretty cheap ($24/yr) and easy. Again, you need to port from your old phone company (before you make the change). 

I moved my Drumexchange.com website over to my teaching site,edhartmanlessons.com.  I hate to lose the brand of that domain.  It should keep me in the looping in the percussion sector!    I use register4less.com.  Good company, low price. 

I don’t know if this is helpful info, but it kept me from losing important brand assets.

One more web tip (Thanks Dan!):  You can embed Soundcloud tracks on your website.  Just get the embed code, and put the html on your site (look for the html editor).  It’s pretty easy and works well.  I did try it, but already have a truckload of music on myhostbaby.com site, edhartmanmusic.com.  I wish my site had the “waveform” look that Soundcloud does.  It’s important for clients to be able to listen  and view the track.  I am also using a free box.com account to store music and make accessible to clents (I can email specific links, and  download options).  There is a player built in, that is pretty cool.


Questions from the Audience: (please email!)

What is a “neutral” track:

That’s a piece of music that fits under the dialogue nicely.  It doesn’t get in the way, or take any of the audience’s attention away from what’s going on the screen.    It might be a track that can morph from scene to scene.  Stay away from strings and heavy pads. The mood is neither happy or sad.  This is a track of mine that seems pretty “neutral”:http://edhartmanmusic.com/new_age/s/rivertrance


LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Advice for home recording and mixing:

http://hwcdn.libsyn.com/p/5/a/3/5a3fc568468df715/ASP031.mp3?c_id=17336468&expiration=1510086604&hwt=f7854b2742c80ce9ad1dc4535b883167

BIZ:

A broad overview of 7 potential ways to make money in music:

 https://audioskills.com/post/4938/

 Trailer House Directory:

http://www.goldentrailer.com/trailer-house/

Talk to an expert (or be one!): ($)

https://clarity.fm/

Find unclaimed royalties:

https://www.royaltyclaim.com

 FREE MIX MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION!

http://www.cfmediaview.com/lp1.aspx?v=6_2632078714_119189_2

TECH:

What’s the Difference Between Stock Plugins and Premium Plugins?

 https://audioskills.com/post/5790/

 I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 


Joke/Quote of the week:

“Jazz will endure just as long people hear it through their feet instead of their brains.”

 John Philip Sousa

 

Patreon Page!

NEW VIDEOS

 

Check out Ed's new music videos! (links menu) or:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=365psRWWY5w&list=PLuihzQ3nbkeQisTXrSz0ojyfmnbQ7s0qz

"Jack Rabbit" Commission

Adventures in Music Licensing October 2017 Vol. 5, No. 10

 

Ed Hartman's

Adventures in Music Licensing

October 2017 Vol. 5, No. 10

Announcements:

*  Happy Fall! Halloween is coming.  Do you have your best horror tracks out there? (http://edhartmanmusic.com/horror___suspense/)

* I am now officially composing full-time! (and teaching a bit, too).  Wow, what a change.  The pressure is on to make licensing a real deal.  I’ve done well with it in the past, but never depended on it.  We will see if it can be done!  I hope my experiences help you explore the vast opportunities of the music biz…

* Welcome new readers! Please email any questions about licensing. I am always happy to respond (and it will go into the next newsletter).

*  I am teaching my next Music Licensing Class on Saturday, Nov 4, 2017, 9am to noon.  (https://continuinged.northseattle.edu/courses/make-money-licensing-your-music). 

Please share this with any musicians, bands, songwriters  or composers you know in the Pacific Northwest.  If you live elsewhere, I am looking to take my class on the road.  Please email me, if you have any ideas or connections with music schools in your area.  I can offer a combination morning Licensing Workshop, and afternoon Percussion Clinic, with a recital in the evening!

* The TAXI Road Rally is coming up in Nov.  Sorry, but I won’t be able to make it, this year.  I do recommend going.  It's a blast and full of info and contacts.  It's a great time to join TAXI, if you can go to the convention.  Mention my name for some freebies (call to join, not online).  You get TWO free tix.  They get a good rate at the hotel (at LAX, no ground trans necessary!). (https://www.taxi.com/) I may put on another Licensing Event in Seattle, like a few years back.  More info, if it gets together.

* NW Composers: Look on FB for Seattle Composer Alliance Monthly Meetups! They will move around, so keep your eyes open. seattlecomposers.org

* I am doing one-on-one consultations (in person, skype or phone). If you are not in the Pacific NW, and would like to get info, please email me (edrums@aol.com) Let me know what you are interested in talking about (licensing, contracts, exclusive vs. non, writing, tech, etc.) and we can schedule a time to talk. My fees are below. If you just have a short question, you can always email it for a general answer in the next newsletter. Please let me know if I can be of help!

* If you have any articles, links, ideas, etc. related to music licensing, please let me know!

* For anyone who has taken my licensing class, I would very much appreciate any testimonials you have about the class. This feedback helps with promoting future classes. Please email me (see below). 


 

Recent adventures in licensing:

Hopefully, these stories of placements can help you understand the reality of licensing. - Ed

*  I am going absolutely bonkers finding connections on Linkedin, FB, Twitter, Music Library Report, etc.  My goal is to triple my clients within a year.  Yikes.

* My filmscore for “The Son, The Father” by Lucas Haas, (premiered opening night at Hollyshorts in August in LA  (TCM/Grauman’s Chinese Theatre!).  Continues to make the rounds of many other festivals, and has won some awards already. I did work with the production company to submit a cue sheet (list of music used in the film) to my PRO, BMI.  I have some good templates, although an a simple text email is fine.  Your PRO can get you info.  I did have to have the production company email BMI with the info.  They need someone from the company to make sure the info is accurate. 

* I just finished a smooth jazz cue for a library I’ve worked with for a long time (originally via TAXI).  I checked in via email, “I was wondering what was going on regarding a previous track…Are you lookingfor anything right now?”)  The library works with network soap-operas.  I did get a similar track sent to work from.  My first attempt was good, but I took off on a tangent, and created something more for me (unsure what I will do with it.).  I did immediately start over, and created a track that the library took.  That track was right on the money.  Same BPM, similar groove, etc.  It’s exclusive, so I kept from getting to involved on it.  If I invest too much effort, I generally don’t like giving it to an exclusive client.  Hopefully, it will do well.  The librarie’s process to take new tracks is:

1)  Email 320 mp3 (with meta) to audition.

2)  Email wav (44/1 Is OK, mp3 with meta) for use.

3)  Email Song info sheet (Schedule A, song title, genre, BPM, PRO info, etc.)

4) Fax or snail mail exclusive contract per song.  I don’t quite understand this.  FAX is the same as an email doc (digital).  Most other companies have abandoned this.  Anyway, I sent it in the mail (no more FAX!).

None of this would be a big deal, except every company has a different process.  Keep track (make a simple list, like above) for each company.  I went back and forth on a few emails to figure out exactly what the library wanted.  For metadata I use Metadatics.  Drag tracks in the program.  Write the meta, and the tracks are done.  The tracks remain where they are in your computer!  Keep in mind, different companies what different metadata.  It’s becoming essential to put this in your tracks.  You may get blacklisted if you don’t!  At the very least, put the song title, and your name on all tracks.

* Happy BMI Day!  I hope your champagne wishes and caviar dreams come true.  My track that was in The Blind Side in 2009, is still king.  It's been an amazing ride.  The upfront was decent ($1500 to me), and it averages $5-10/play, as far as I can tell.  It is on religiously on ABC Family, ABC, MTV, TBS, etc.  The film was one of the only American Football films to ever do well outside of the US, because it is such a good drama.  I still get a kick out of watching my scene. It comes during the only game in the film.  It's way back in the mix, as an off-screen marching band (about the 4th one in the scene)  The track "Football Funk" was recorded pre-DAW on a Tascam 8 track digital, with Roland Keyboards, and live percussion.  The live percussion sells the track.  The brass only had 2 tracks, low and high, so I really had to "perform" the tracks.  No note entry.  I had to improvise the arrangement.  Editing was tricky on that machine, so I had to get the takes right.   I continue to get inspired by the track to do my performing on my tracks, rather than writing them in.  I usually pays off.   (http://edhartmanmusic.com/sports_soundtracks/s/football_funk) The placement from from a very supervisory library, with great folks running it (Composers and Supervisors).  Ironically, I received the original email from the company, while I was at a TAXI Rally.  It's a great movie with a terrific score by Carter Burwell.  My favorite scene is when the coaches watch the video of Michael Oher (true story!).  The placement of "How High the Moon" (Les Paul and Mary Ford) is absolutely perfect.

*  Crucial Music did just accept a few more of my tracks.  I generally run 25% accepted for what I submit.  They only allow 3 songs submitted at a time.  It can take a few months for each set of songs.  I immediately add new ones as soon as the old ones are submitted or rejected. 

*  Speaking of acceptance, I’ve had a good run of forwards via TAXI, since my new studio is done.  This is a good sign, that my tech is getting better.  I’m waiting to hear from the clients.  One thing about TAXI. Even if your song is forwarded, that’s not a guarantee that the client will want it for their project or library.  If you are pitching to exclusive libraries, this can be tricky.  You may have to wait for contact from the library (can take months), before abandoning them.  Personally, I give the library a few months max, and then I consider the track available for other pitching.  If they are truly interested in my abilities, I should be able to create something similar, quickly.  It’s all about getting the door open.

* Platinum Music (UK) was originally non-exclusive, and now exclusive.  They are doing considerable overseas licensing, which non-exclusive doesn’t seem to work for.  I recommend submitting to both exclusive an non-exclusive.  It’s like investing.  You want to spread your investments around.


 

Tales from the Tech-Side:

My studio is now official.  I have already had things go wrong! (bad cables, falling microphones, etc.)  Regular maintenance is the key.  I don’t like it, but you need to fix stuff before the next project.  There is nothing more stressful that have a deadline, and things don’t work.  Always have a backup, if possible.  That can be an extra mic, cord, etc. 


 

Questions from the Audience: 

(Questions from Barb)

Hi Ed! I listened to your "reality show" bits and the Beethoven Samba- totally cool! Do you have links to a few songs with vocals you've done? Do you sing them yourself or hire vocalists? No real reason to ask except to enjoy hearing your work.

I’ve only done a handful of vocals.  I’ve tried to sing, but still can’t stand  my voice.  The only success I’ve ever had singing is either doing Harry Belafonte (“Shake , shake, shake Senora..”) or Blues Bros. (“Sweet Home, Chicago”)  That would only be live, though!   My recorded voice sucks!  If I can find the right type of vocal, I might have a shot.  Otherwise, here’s what I have written, with other singers:

http://edhartmanmusic.com/vocal_songs/

The Lights of Christmas –This track is  on CD Baby.  My attempt at “White Christmas”  Great vocal by Cheryl Johnson.  It has been forwarded a bit (TAXI).  Still waiting for a good placement.

Of Days Gone By* – Classic jazz ballad with excellent vocals by Dina Blade. 

Memories* – A little waltz.

Spygirls – This was a major challenge to create a  Shirley Bassey, “Goldfinger” song for a Documentary about  the artist of James Bond posters! Again, a great performance by Cheryl Johnson.  I know I can do a better job now, but the tune is good.

Adam and Eve Shuffle – This was a very quickly done track for an opening credits of a local film.  Cheryl kicks butt.

Hook Line and Sinker – This calypso was for a film that never got going.  Too bad, the director  was in contact with Robin Williams!  Cheryl does it again!

Nobody* – Dina recorded this little jazz swing tune.

*Recorded on my Tascam digital  years ago.  The rest were recording on my MAC (Logic)

There are companies such as Secret Road, All Media, Cellar Music, Big Yellow Dog etc. I heard they are licensing companies that are good to work with. I think you have to be selected to belong and can't apply to them...

I have not heard of them.  I will check.  I am looking for all kinds of opps right now!  Thanks.

What about APM?- are they a library? Licensing company? Publisher? Both? (You've mentioned them and Reverbnation works with them...they're owned by Sony & Universal).

I’ve just started looking at APM.  The own a number of exclusive libraries.  I am checking on Killertracks, and Universal Production Music.  You have to do a bit of digging.  Via Linkedin and FB, I have grabbed some outstanding lists of libraries folks are submitting to.

This is what comes up with APM and Reverbnation:

https://www.apmmusic.com/libraries/reverbnation-music-rnm

And in your current newsletter, you discuss "royalty-free libraries": Are Songtradr, Crucial, APM, Audiosparx, MusicSupervisor, royalty-free?

RF is really about one time licensing of a track for multiple use (more than one project).  Most libraries license one track for one project at a time.  If you need the track for two projects (or even two uses in the same project) you need two licenses.  All of the libraries above do single use licensing.  Again the words Royalty Free are used in confusing ways. 

Songtradr is a songplatform and slowly becoming a non-exclusive library, as far as I can tell.  They connect you with clients.  I wounldn’t call them royalty free. Crucial is absolutely not RF.  In fact, they don’t allow artists to submit music that is in some RF libraries.  APM is exclusive, the opposite of RF.

Have you ever used ArtTracks to do a video? What does a video using a template cost? What are your thoughts about something like this versus hiring an actual videographer?

I do my own videos!  (https://www.youtube.com/user/edhartman1)

I might work with a local filmmaker to barter music for a video. 

What about DropTrack for music promotion? They pay people to listen to your music. Is it kind of scammy? Sounds like Music XRay or Music Submit. On Music Submit they can listen to your music for a couple seconds and get paid. No wonder the rate of return is so low although I did get on some radio stations through them.

Never used them.  Looks like promo for radio, etc.

Have you ever heard of Jamendo Licensing. Advertised at CD Baby convention. I'm not going to bother. Why should consumers listen to music for free? At least on Spotify you get some kind of royalty. And the library is totally just a stock royalty-free library. Unless you have a different experience?

Never heard of them.  I’m focused on licensing, rather than promo.  Jamendo looks like an RF library.  Watch it with YT conflicts. 


 

LINKS OF THE MONTH:

Workflow Tips:

https://audioskills.com/episode/5386/?utm_source=broadcast20170913&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=podcast

BIZ:

The Future of Advertising Music Royalties:

https://shootonline.com/column/future-advertising-music-royalties

FREE MIX MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION!

http://www.cfmediaview.com/lp1.aspx?v=6_2632078714_119189_2

TECH:

Ad Cutdowns:

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/music-picture/988145-edits.html

METATAGES FOR ALL!

https://tagsgenerator.com/#/


 

Ed Hartman Consultation

I am always available for one-on-one consultation, in person or via phone or Skype (call or email to set up)

One hour: $70.00

Two hours: $120.00

Groups: contact for price

I will be happy to critique your music, make recommendations for marketing, suggest libraries to put you music in, help figure out studio configurations (although I am not a heavy tech person. I can recommend people, though), and give you general career advice. If you are interested, please call or email. 


Joke/Quote of the week:

“When I speak of the gifted listener, I am thinking of the non-musician primarily, of the listener who intends to retain his amateur status. It is the thought of just such a listener that excites the composer in me.”

Aaron Copland

Spring 2016

 

Back from the ASCAP Expo 2016!  What a great event to meet other composers and songwriters.  I will be putting info I gathered in upcoming licensing newsletters.  Please sign up!

2016:  I will have a jazz track, "Rainfall", in a new film, "A Different Sun", courtesy of Indigi Music.  

Music Licensing Shindig FOLLOW-UP!

 

I would like to thank EVERYONE who participated and attended the:
Music Licensing Shindig!
(Film and TV Music Networking Event)
facebook.com/events/186526935016082/
Wednesday, Nov 18, 2015, 7-10pm
Seattle Creative Arts Center, Ballard, Seattle, WA

It was a HUGE success!  There were tons of folks there, and everyone seemed to be very excited about the information presented.  

Thanks to:
Seattle Creative Arts Center
and
Seattle Composers Alliance
for co-sponsoring!

Special mention to Dean Krippaehne for a tremendous presentation about making tracks for licensing, and being on the panel! Also thanks to:  Seth Littlefield, Ken Morrison, and Travis Geer (Audiosocket Music Library) for participating on the panel Q & A. Of course, my trusty sidekick, Kelly Loch (Sound Design Specialist) was there helping with audio and video tech, and Doug Zangar helped out with some much needed cables and funny banter!

I hope this will inspire our composing and songwriting community to create a larger full-scale event in the coming year. I envision a day-long event with 100s of attendees, that has multiple workshops and panels on writing, arranging, tech, pitching, business, legal, etc. Representatives from the licensing industry (music supervisors, music libraries, lawyers, pitching companies, etc.) would be invited. Please let me know if you are interested in helping out. Please share this info with anyone you know who is interested in music licensing. Send them to edhartmanmusic.com to get on the mailing list!
 

Welcome to Edhartmanmusic.com!

 

I hope you enjoy this website, and all of the music on it. Please feel free to email me regarding questions about music, percussion, performances, teaching (I teach in Seattle, WA), etc.

Filmmakers:

I am always interested in writing music for film, television, and media of all kinds. If you have a project, please let me know and I will be happy to create samples for scenes.

RSS feed